Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters

Anna Nicholson, Ron Borland, Pele Bennet, Anke E van der Sterren, Matthew Stevens, David Thomas

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objectives: To describe attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters and assess how they are associated with quitting, and to compare these attitudes with those of smokers in the general Australian population.

    Design, setting and participants: The Talking About The Smokes project used a quota sampling design to recruit participants from communities served by 34 Aboriginal community-controlled health services and one community in the Torres Strait. We surveyed 1392 daily smokers, 251 non-daily smokers and 78 recent quitters from April 2012 to October 2013.

    Main outcome measures: Personal attitudes towards smoking and quitting, wanting to quit, and attempting to quit in the past year.

    Results: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander daily smokers were less likely than daily smokers in the general Australian population to report enjoying smoking (65% v 81%) and more likely to disagree that smoking is an important part of their life (49% v 38%); other attitudes were similar between the two groups. In the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sample, non-daily smokers generally held less positive attitudes towards smoking compared with daily smokers, and ex-smokers who had quit within the past year reported positive views about quitting. Among the daily smokers, 78% reported regretting starting to smoke and 81% reported spending too much money on cigarettes, both of which were positively associated with wanting and attempting to quit; 32% perceived smoking to be an important part of their life, which was negatively associated with both quit outcomes; and 83% agreed that smoking calms them down when stressed, which was not associated with the quitting outcomes.

    Conclusions: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers were less likely than those in the general population to report positive reasons to smoke and held similar views about the negative aspects, suggesting that factors other than personal attitudes may be responsible for the high continuing smoking rate in this population.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)s51-s56
    Number of pages6
    JournalMedical Journal of Australia
    Volume202
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    Smoking
    Smoke
    Population
    Community Health Services
    Tobacco Products
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    Cite this

    Nicholson, Anna ; Borland, Ron ; Bennet, Pele ; van der Sterren, Anke E ; Stevens, Matthew ; Thomas, David. / Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2015 ; Vol. 202, No. 10. pp. s51-s56.
    @article{7dba98b601224898acd2a57b210ed82d,
    title = "Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters",
    abstract = "Objectives: To describe attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters and assess how they are associated with quitting, and to compare these attitudes with those of smokers in the general Australian population. Design, setting and participants: The Talking About The Smokes project used a quota sampling design to recruit participants from communities served by 34 Aboriginal community-controlled health services and one community in the Torres Strait. We surveyed 1392 daily smokers, 251 non-daily smokers and 78 recent quitters from April 2012 to October 2013. Main outcome measures: Personal attitudes towards smoking and quitting, wanting to quit, and attempting to quit in the past year. Results: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander daily smokers were less likely than daily smokers in the general Australian population to report enjoying smoking (65{\%} v 81{\%}) and more likely to disagree that smoking is an important part of their life (49{\%} v 38{\%}); other attitudes were similar between the two groups. In the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sample, non-daily smokers generally held less positive attitudes towards smoking compared with daily smokers, and ex-smokers who had quit within the past year reported positive views about quitting. Among the daily smokers, 78{\%} reported regretting starting to smoke and 81{\%} reported spending too much money on cigarettes, both of which were positively associated with wanting and attempting to quit; 32{\%} perceived smoking to be an important part of their life, which was negatively associated with both quit outcomes; and 83{\%} agreed that smoking calms them down when stressed, which was not associated with the quitting outcomes. Conclusions: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers were less likely than those in the general population to report positive reasons to smoke and held similar views about the negative aspects, suggesting that factors other than personal attitudes may be responsible for the high continuing smoking rate in this population.",
    keywords = "adult, aged, Article, attitude, Australia, Australian Aborigine, comparative study, female, follow up, health care survey, human, interview, male, middle aged, outcome assessment, smoking, smoking cessation, socioeconomics, Torres Strait Islander, young adult, adolescent, adverse effects, attitude to health, economics, epidemiology, ethnology, longitudinal study, Oceanic ancestry group, participatory research, prospective study, questionnaire, Adolescent, Adult, Attitude to Health, Community-Based Participatory Research, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Oceanic Ancestry Group, Prospective Studies, Questionnaires, Sampling Studies, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Young Adult",
    author = "Anna Nicholson and Ron Borland and Pele Bennet and {van der Sterren}, {Anke E} and Matthew Stevens and David Thomas",
    year = "2015",
    doi = "10.5694/mja14.01535",
    language = "English",
    volume = "202",
    pages = "s51--s56",
    journal = "Medical Journal of Australia",
    issn = "0025-729X",
    publisher = "Australasian Medical Publishing Company",
    number = "10",

    }

    Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters. / Nicholson, Anna; Borland, Ron; Bennet, Pele; van der Sterren, Anke E; Stevens, Matthew; Thomas, David.

    In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 202, No. 10, 2015, p. s51-s56.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters

    AU - Nicholson, Anna

    AU - Borland, Ron

    AU - Bennet, Pele

    AU - van der Sterren, Anke E

    AU - Stevens, Matthew

    AU - Thomas, David

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - Objectives: To describe attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters and assess how they are associated with quitting, and to compare these attitudes with those of smokers in the general Australian population. Design, setting and participants: The Talking About The Smokes project used a quota sampling design to recruit participants from communities served by 34 Aboriginal community-controlled health services and one community in the Torres Strait. We surveyed 1392 daily smokers, 251 non-daily smokers and 78 recent quitters from April 2012 to October 2013. Main outcome measures: Personal attitudes towards smoking and quitting, wanting to quit, and attempting to quit in the past year. Results: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander daily smokers were less likely than daily smokers in the general Australian population to report enjoying smoking (65% v 81%) and more likely to disagree that smoking is an important part of their life (49% v 38%); other attitudes were similar between the two groups. In the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sample, non-daily smokers generally held less positive attitudes towards smoking compared with daily smokers, and ex-smokers who had quit within the past year reported positive views about quitting. Among the daily smokers, 78% reported regretting starting to smoke and 81% reported spending too much money on cigarettes, both of which were positively associated with wanting and attempting to quit; 32% perceived smoking to be an important part of their life, which was negatively associated with both quit outcomes; and 83% agreed that smoking calms them down when stressed, which was not associated with the quitting outcomes. Conclusions: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers were less likely than those in the general population to report positive reasons to smoke and held similar views about the negative aspects, suggesting that factors other than personal attitudes may be responsible for the high continuing smoking rate in this population.

    AB - Objectives: To describe attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters and assess how they are associated with quitting, and to compare these attitudes with those of smokers in the general Australian population. Design, setting and participants: The Talking About The Smokes project used a quota sampling design to recruit participants from communities served by 34 Aboriginal community-controlled health services and one community in the Torres Strait. We surveyed 1392 daily smokers, 251 non-daily smokers and 78 recent quitters from April 2012 to October 2013. Main outcome measures: Personal attitudes towards smoking and quitting, wanting to quit, and attempting to quit in the past year. Results: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander daily smokers were less likely than daily smokers in the general Australian population to report enjoying smoking (65% v 81%) and more likely to disagree that smoking is an important part of their life (49% v 38%); other attitudes were similar between the two groups. In the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sample, non-daily smokers generally held less positive attitudes towards smoking compared with daily smokers, and ex-smokers who had quit within the past year reported positive views about quitting. Among the daily smokers, 78% reported regretting starting to smoke and 81% reported spending too much money on cigarettes, both of which were positively associated with wanting and attempting to quit; 32% perceived smoking to be an important part of their life, which was negatively associated with both quit outcomes; and 83% agreed that smoking calms them down when stressed, which was not associated with the quitting outcomes. Conclusions: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers were less likely than those in the general population to report positive reasons to smoke and held similar views about the negative aspects, suggesting that factors other than personal attitudes may be responsible for the high continuing smoking rate in this population.

    KW - adult

    KW - aged

    KW - Article

    KW - attitude

    KW - Australia

    KW - Australian Aborigine

    KW - comparative study

    KW - female

    KW - follow up

    KW - health care survey

    KW - human

    KW - interview

    KW - male

    KW - middle aged

    KW - outcome assessment

    KW - smoking

    KW - smoking cessation

    KW - socioeconomics

    KW - Torres Strait Islander

    KW - young adult

    KW - adolescent

    KW - adverse effects

    KW - attitude to health

    KW - economics

    KW - epidemiology

    KW - ethnology

    KW - longitudinal study

    KW - Oceanic ancestry group

    KW - participatory research

    KW - prospective study

    KW - questionnaire

    KW - Adolescent

    KW - Adult

    KW - Attitude to Health

    KW - Community-Based Participatory Research

    KW - Female

    KW - Humans

    KW - Longitudinal Studies

    KW - Male

    KW - Middle Aged

    KW - Oceanic Ancestry Group

    KW - Prospective Studies

    KW - Questionnaires

    KW - Sampling Studies

    KW - Smoking

    KW - Smoking Cessation

    KW - Young Adult

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930146278&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.5694/mja14.01535

    DO - 10.5694/mja14.01535

    M3 - Article

    VL - 202

    SP - s51-s56

    JO - Medical Journal of Australia

    JF - Medical Journal of Australia

    SN - 0025-729X

    IS - 10

    ER -