Personal, provider and system level barriers and enablers for hepatitis C treatment in the era of direct-acting antivirals: Experiences of patients who inject drugs accessing treatment in general practice settings in Australia

Emma Heard, Andrew Smirnov, Luciana Massi, Linda A. Selvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Direct acting antiviral (DAA) treatment has made the elimination of hepatitis C virus (HCV) a realisable global public health goal and people who inject drugs are a key target population. This study investigates barriers and enablers to DAA treatment of HCV in general practice settings in Australia, from the patient perspective. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 patients; of these patients, seventeen participants were currently on opioid agonist therapy, and four were currently injecting drugs. Thematic data analysis was undertaken and a personal, provider and systems framework was used to describe the barriers and enablers to DAA treatment. Results suggest a range of initiatives are required to support the uptake of DAA in general practice settings. These include the provision of formalised peer information and support, and increasing the accessibility of blood tests and liver assessment on-site. Further, there remains a need to address stigma and discrimination affecting people who inject drugs in community healthcare settings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108460
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021
Externally publishedYes

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