Pertussis epidemiology prior to the introduction of a maternal vaccination program, Queensland Australia

Lisa Mchugh, Kerri A. Viney, Ross Andrews, Stephen B Lambert

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Pertussis morbidity is highest in infants too young to be fully protected by routine vaccination schedules. Alternate vaccine strategies are required to maximise protection in this age-group. To understand baseline pertussis epidemiology prior to the introduction of the maternal pertussis vaccination program in 2014, we conducted a retrospective case series analyses of 53 901 notifications and temporal trends from 1997 to 2014. Notifications were highest in infants younger than 4 months of age and highest annual notification rates in infants younger than 1 month of age (308/100 000 per year). Amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants aged younger than 1 month, this rate was 576/100 000 per year. Notification rates were 40% higher amongst women 15–44 years, 62·4/100 000 population compared with men (44·5/100 000) and 90% higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of the same age (38·2/100 000) compared with men (19·7/100 000). Six infant deaths were identified, all younger than 2 months of age. Monitoring epidemiology in at-risk groups – infants too young to be vaccinated, women of childbearing age and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples – following implementation of the maternal pertussis vaccination program will be important to assess its impact and safety.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)207-217
    Number of pages11
    JournalEpidemiology and Infection
    Volume146
    Issue number2
    Early online date2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

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    Queensland
    Whooping Cough
    Vaccination
    Epidemiology
    Mothers
    Appointments and Schedules
    Vaccines
    Age Groups
    Morbidity
    Safety
    Population

    Cite this

    Mchugh, Lisa ; Viney, Kerri A. ; Andrews, Ross ; Lambert, Stephen B. / Pertussis epidemiology prior to the introduction of a maternal vaccination program, Queensland Australia. In: Epidemiology and Infection. 2018 ; Vol. 146, No. 2. pp. 207-217.
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    title = "Pertussis epidemiology prior to the introduction of a maternal vaccination program, Queensland Australia",
    abstract = "Pertussis morbidity is highest in infants too young to be fully protected by routine vaccination schedules. Alternate vaccine strategies are required to maximise protection in this age-group. To understand baseline pertussis epidemiology prior to the introduction of the maternal pertussis vaccination program in 2014, we conducted a retrospective case series analyses of 53 901 notifications and temporal trends from 1997 to 2014. Notifications were highest in infants younger than 4 months of age and highest annual notification rates in infants younger than 1 month of age (308/100 000 per year). Amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants aged younger than 1 month, this rate was 576/100 000 per year. Notification rates were 40{\%} higher amongst women 15–44 years, 62·4/100 000 population compared with men (44·5/100 000) and 90{\%} higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of the same age (38·2/100 000) compared with men (19·7/100 000). Six infant deaths were identified, all younger than 2 months of age. Monitoring epidemiology in at-risk groups – infants too young to be vaccinated, women of childbearing age and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples – following implementation of the maternal pertussis vaccination program will be important to assess its impact and safety.",
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    Pertussis epidemiology prior to the introduction of a maternal vaccination program, Queensland Australia. / Mchugh, Lisa; Viney, Kerri A.; Andrews, Ross; Lambert, Stephen B.

    In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 146, No. 2, 01.2018, p. 207-217.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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