Pharmacy clients' attitudes to expanded pharmacist prescribing and the role of agency theory on involved stakeholders

Kreshnik Hoti, Jeffery Hughes, Bruce Sunderland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine the views of regular pharmacy clients on pharmacist prescribing and employ agency theory in considering the relationship between the stakeholders involved. 

Methods: Computer assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 400 pharmacy clients recruited around Australia. Potential respondents were identified using a random number generation function in Microsoft Excel. Data were analysed with SPSS version 17 using one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis and linear regression. The relationships between the main stakeholders involved were explored using agency theory. 

Key findings: A total of 1153 answered calls recruited 400 consenting pharmacy clients. Most respondents (71%) trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded role in prescribing, however the majority (66%) supported this only after a diagnosis had been made by a doctor. Those who accepted pharmacist diagnosing and prescribing preferred that this was limited to pain management and antibiotics. Most respondents (64%) considered that expanded pharmacist prescribing would improve their access to prescription medicines, although those over 65 years of age were less supportive than younger respondents. Factors which contributed positively to clients' perception of trust in an expanded prescribing role for pharmacists were identified, and improved access to medicines was found to be the strongest predictor (P < 0.0001).

Conclusion: Most pharmacy clients trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded prescribing role, but preferred that this was limited to doctors performing the initial diagnosis. Agency theory would conceptualize the introduction of pharmacist prescribers, as disrupting the principal (patient) agent (doctor) relationship. Its introduction would best be facilitated by careful change management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-12
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume19
Issue number1
Early online date14 Jan 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Pharmacists
Random number generation
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Telephone
Linear regression
Principal component analysis
Medicine
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Proxy
Pain Management
Principal Component Analysis
Prescriptions
Linear Models
Analysis of Variance
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: To examine the views of regular pharmacy clients on pharmacist prescribing and employ agency theory in considering the relationship between the stakeholders involved. Methods: Computer assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 400 pharmacy clients recruited around Australia. Potential respondents were identified using a random number generation function in Microsoft Excel. Data were analysed with SPSS version 17 using one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis and linear regression. The relationships between the main stakeholders involved were explored using agency theory. Key findings: A total of 1153 answered calls recruited 400 consenting pharmacy clients. Most respondents (71{\%}) trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded role in prescribing, however the majority (66{\%}) supported this only after a diagnosis had been made by a doctor. Those who accepted pharmacist diagnosing and prescribing preferred that this was limited to pain management and antibiotics. Most respondents (64{\%}) considered that expanded pharmacist prescribing would improve their access to prescription medicines, although those over 65 years of age were less supportive than younger respondents. Factors which contributed positively to clients' perception of trust in an expanded prescribing role for pharmacists were identified, and improved access to medicines was found to be the strongest predictor (P < 0.0001).Conclusion: Most pharmacy clients trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded prescribing role, but preferred that this was limited to doctors performing the initial diagnosis. Agency theory would conceptualize the introduction of pharmacist prescribers, as disrupting the principal (patient) agent (doctor) relationship. Its introduction would best be facilitated by careful change management.",
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Pharmacy clients' attitudes to expanded pharmacist prescribing and the role of agency theory on involved stakeholders. / Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery; Sunderland, Bruce.

In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 19, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 5-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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