Phylogenomic analysis reveals an Asian origin for African Burkholderia pseudomallei and further supports melioidosis endemicity in Africa

Derek Sarovich, Benoit Garin, Brigit De Smet, Mirjam Kaestli, Mark Mayo, Peter Vandamme, Jan Jacobs, Palpouguini Lompo, Marc Tahita, Halidou Tinto, Innocente Djaomalaza, Bart Currie, Erin Price

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, an environmental bacterium that causes the deadly disease melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. An increasing number of melioidosis cases are being reported in other tropical regions, including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. B. pseudomallei first emerged in Australia, with subsequent rare dissemination event(s) to Southeast Asia; however, its dispersal to other regions is not yet well understood. We used large-scale comparative genomics to investigate the origins of three B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and two from Burkina Faso. Phylogenomic reconstruction demonstrates that these African B. pseudomallei isolates group into a single novel clade that resides within the more ancestral Asian clade. Intriguingly, South American strains reside within the African clade, suggesting more recent dissemination from West Africa to the Americas. Anthropogenic factors likely assisted in B. pseudomallei dissemination to Africa, possibly during migration of the Austronesian peoples from Indonesian Borneo to Madagascar ~2,000 years ago, with subsequent genetic diversity driven by mutation and recombination. Our study provides new insights into global patterns of B. pseudomallei dissemination and adds to the growing body of evidence of melioidosis endemicity in Africa. Our findings have important implications for melioidosis diagnosis and management in Africa.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere00089-15
    Pages (from-to)1-12
    Number of pages12
    JournalmSphere
    Volume1
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 9 Mar 2016

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    Melioidosis
    Burkholderia pseudomallei
    Madagascar
    Southeastern Asia
    Indian Ocean Islands
    Borneo
    Northern Asia
    Burkina Faso
    Western Africa
    Genomics
    Genetic Recombination
    Bacteria
    Mutation

    Cite this

    Sarovich, Derek ; Garin, Benoit ; De Smet, Brigit ; Kaestli, Mirjam ; Mayo, Mark ; Vandamme, Peter ; Jacobs, Jan ; Lompo, Palpouguini ; Tahita, Marc ; Tinto, Halidou ; Djaomalaza, Innocente ; Currie, Bart ; Price, Erin. / Phylogenomic analysis reveals an Asian origin for African Burkholderia pseudomallei and further supports melioidosis endemicity in Africa. In: mSphere. 2016 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 1-12.
    @article{815d5b6ce2634d27a222ff207e16807f,
    title = "Phylogenomic analysis reveals an Asian origin for African Burkholderia pseudomallei and further supports melioidosis endemicity in Africa",
    abstract = "Burkholderia pseudomallei, an environmental bacterium that causes the deadly disease melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. An increasing number of melioidosis cases are being reported in other tropical regions, including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. B. pseudomallei first emerged in Australia, with subsequent rare dissemination event(s) to Southeast Asia; however, its dispersal to other regions is not yet well understood. We used large-scale comparative genomics to investigate the origins of three B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and two from Burkina Faso. Phylogenomic reconstruction demonstrates that these African B. pseudomallei isolates group into a single novel clade that resides within the more ancestral Asian clade. Intriguingly, South American strains reside within the African clade, suggesting more recent dissemination from West Africa to the Americas. Anthropogenic factors likely assisted in B. pseudomallei dissemination to Africa, possibly during migration of the Austronesian peoples from Indonesian Borneo to Madagascar ~2,000 years ago, with subsequent genetic diversity driven by mutation and recombination. Our study provides new insights into global patterns of B. pseudomallei dissemination and adds to the growing body of evidence of melioidosis endemicity in Africa. Our findings have important implications for melioidosis diagnosis and management in Africa.",
    author = "Derek Sarovich and Benoit Garin and {De Smet}, Brigit and Mirjam Kaestli and Mark Mayo and Peter Vandamme and Jan Jacobs and Palpouguini Lompo and Marc Tahita and Halidou Tinto and Innocente Djaomalaza and Bart Currie and Erin Price",
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    Sarovich, D, Garin, B, De Smet, B, Kaestli, M, Mayo, M, Vandamme, P, Jacobs, J, Lompo, P, Tahita, M, Tinto, H, Djaomalaza, I, Currie, B & Price, E 2016, 'Phylogenomic analysis reveals an Asian origin for African Burkholderia pseudomallei and further supports melioidosis endemicity in Africa', mSphere, vol. 1, no. 2, e00089-15, pp. 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1128/mSphere.00089-15

    Phylogenomic analysis reveals an Asian origin for African Burkholderia pseudomallei and further supports melioidosis endemicity in Africa. / Sarovich, Derek; Garin, Benoit; De Smet, Brigit; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Vandamme, Peter; Jacobs, Jan; Lompo, Palpouguini; Tahita, Marc; Tinto, Halidou; Djaomalaza, Innocente; Currie, Bart; Price, Erin.

    In: mSphere, Vol. 1, No. 2, e00089-15, 09.03.2016, p. 1-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Sarovich, Derek

    AU - Garin, Benoit

    AU - De Smet, Brigit

    AU - Kaestli, Mirjam

    AU - Mayo, Mark

    AU - Vandamme, Peter

    AU - Jacobs, Jan

    AU - Lompo, Palpouguini

    AU - Tahita, Marc

    AU - Tinto, Halidou

    AU - Djaomalaza, Innocente

    AU - Currie, Bart

    AU - Price, Erin

    PY - 2016/3/9

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    N2 - Burkholderia pseudomallei, an environmental bacterium that causes the deadly disease melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. An increasing number of melioidosis cases are being reported in other tropical regions, including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. B. pseudomallei first emerged in Australia, with subsequent rare dissemination event(s) to Southeast Asia; however, its dispersal to other regions is not yet well understood. We used large-scale comparative genomics to investigate the origins of three B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and two from Burkina Faso. Phylogenomic reconstruction demonstrates that these African B. pseudomallei isolates group into a single novel clade that resides within the more ancestral Asian clade. Intriguingly, South American strains reside within the African clade, suggesting more recent dissemination from West Africa to the Americas. Anthropogenic factors likely assisted in B. pseudomallei dissemination to Africa, possibly during migration of the Austronesian peoples from Indonesian Borneo to Madagascar ~2,000 years ago, with subsequent genetic diversity driven by mutation and recombination. Our study provides new insights into global patterns of B. pseudomallei dissemination and adds to the growing body of evidence of melioidosis endemicity in Africa. Our findings have important implications for melioidosis diagnosis and management in Africa.

    AB - Burkholderia pseudomallei, an environmental bacterium that causes the deadly disease melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. An increasing number of melioidosis cases are being reported in other tropical regions, including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. B. pseudomallei first emerged in Australia, with subsequent rare dissemination event(s) to Southeast Asia; however, its dispersal to other regions is not yet well understood. We used large-scale comparative genomics to investigate the origins of three B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and two from Burkina Faso. Phylogenomic reconstruction demonstrates that these African B. pseudomallei isolates group into a single novel clade that resides within the more ancestral Asian clade. Intriguingly, South American strains reside within the African clade, suggesting more recent dissemination from West Africa to the Americas. Anthropogenic factors likely assisted in B. pseudomallei dissemination to Africa, possibly during migration of the Austronesian peoples from Indonesian Borneo to Madagascar ~2,000 years ago, with subsequent genetic diversity driven by mutation and recombination. Our study provides new insights into global patterns of B. pseudomallei dissemination and adds to the growing body of evidence of melioidosis endemicity in Africa. Our findings have important implications for melioidosis diagnosis and management in Africa.

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    DO - 10.1128/mSphere.00089-15

    M3 - Article

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