Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery

Stephen P. Fitzgerald, Niels Grote Beverborg, Yves Beguin, Ferruh Artunc, Henrik Falhammar, Nigel G. Bean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Hemoglobin levels are believed to be regulated as per a set point model of regulation. This model of regulation, by which specific levels of a parameter are targeted and defended by physiological systems, implies a particular population correlation between the parameter and its controlling hormone. Empirical population correlations of other parameters and their controlling hormones, have denied the presence of such set point-based regulation. To assess if hemoglobin is regulated according to a set point model we performed a systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Web of Science identifying relevant reports published up to November 2018. Population hemoglobin/erythropoietin level correlations were retrieved, and these empirically derived correlations were compared with the positive correlation implied by a set point model of regulation. Authors of papers containing potentially suitable data were contacted with requests for further analyses, and a meta-analysis was performed. Twelve correlations between hemoglobin and erythropoietin levels from eleven papers were analyzed. None of these correlations were significantly positive, three, restricted to the normal range of hemoglobin, were significantly negative. All but one of the other correlations showed a negative trend. New analyses of previously published data sets resulted in similar findings. In particular a new analysis of large data sets of males (n = 2417) and females (n = 2592) with normal range hemoglobin levels, revealed significantly negative correlations. A meta-analysis of our results indicated that the data overall are not consistent with a positive relationship between hemoglobin and erythropoietin (P < 0.0001). Population data indicate that individuals do not have set point levels of hemoglobin.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14153
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalPhysiological Reports
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Hemoglobins
Oxygen
Population
Erythropoietin
Meta-Analysis
Reference Values
Hormones
PubMed
MEDLINE
Datasets

Cite this

Fitzgerald, S. P., Grote Beverborg, N., Beguin, Y., Artunc, F., Falhammar, H., & Bean, N. G. (2019). Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery. Physiological Reports, 7(12), 1-10. [e14153]. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14153
Fitzgerald, Stephen P. ; Grote Beverborg, Niels ; Beguin, Yves ; Artunc, Ferruh ; Falhammar, Henrik ; Bean, Nigel G. / Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery. In: Physiological Reports. 2019 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 1-10.
@article{4845448cdbc243ed975f6ab367585b00,
title = "Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery",
abstract = "Hemoglobin levels are believed to be regulated as per a set point model of regulation. This model of regulation, by which specific levels of a parameter are targeted and defended by physiological systems, implies a particular population correlation between the parameter and its controlling hormone. Empirical population correlations of other parameters and their controlling hormones, have denied the presence of such set point-based regulation. To assess if hemoglobin is regulated according to a set point model we performed a systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Web of Science identifying relevant reports published up to November 2018. Population hemoglobin/erythropoietin level correlations were retrieved, and these empirically derived correlations were compared with the positive correlation implied by a set point model of regulation. Authors of papers containing potentially suitable data were contacted with requests for further analyses, and a meta-analysis was performed. Twelve correlations between hemoglobin and erythropoietin levels from eleven papers were analyzed. None of these correlations were significantly positive, three, restricted to the normal range of hemoglobin, were significantly negative. All but one of the other correlations showed a negative trend. New analyses of previously published data sets resulted in similar findings. In particular a new analysis of large data sets of males (n = 2417) and females (n = 2592) with normal range hemoglobin levels, revealed significantly negative correlations. A meta-analysis of our results indicated that the data overall are not consistent with a positive relationship between hemoglobin and erythropoietin (P < 0.0001). Population data indicate that individuals do not have set point levels of hemoglobin.",
keywords = "Erythropoietin, haemoglobin, population correlations, set point",
author = "Fitzgerald, {Stephen P.} and {Grote Beverborg}, Niels and Yves Beguin and Ferruh Artunc and Henrik Falhammar and Bean, {Nigel G.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.14814/phy2.14153",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Physiological Reports",
issn = "2051-817X",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
number = "12",

}

Fitzgerald, SP, Grote Beverborg, N, Beguin, Y, Artunc, F, Falhammar, H & Bean, NG 2019, 'Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery' Physiological Reports, vol. 7, no. 12, e14153, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14153

Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery. / Fitzgerald, Stephen P.; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Beguin, Yves; Artunc, Ferruh; Falhammar, Henrik; Bean, Nigel G.

In: Physiological Reports, Vol. 7, No. 12, e14153, 01.07.2019, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Population data provide evidence against the presence of a set point for hemoglobin levels or tissue oxygen delivery

AU - Fitzgerald, Stephen P.

AU - Grote Beverborg, Niels

AU - Beguin, Yves

AU - Artunc, Ferruh

AU - Falhammar, Henrik

AU - Bean, Nigel G.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Hemoglobin levels are believed to be regulated as per a set point model of regulation. This model of regulation, by which specific levels of a parameter are targeted and defended by physiological systems, implies a particular population correlation between the parameter and its controlling hormone. Empirical population correlations of other parameters and their controlling hormones, have denied the presence of such set point-based regulation. To assess if hemoglobin is regulated according to a set point model we performed a systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Web of Science identifying relevant reports published up to November 2018. Population hemoglobin/erythropoietin level correlations were retrieved, and these empirically derived correlations were compared with the positive correlation implied by a set point model of regulation. Authors of papers containing potentially suitable data were contacted with requests for further analyses, and a meta-analysis was performed. Twelve correlations between hemoglobin and erythropoietin levels from eleven papers were analyzed. None of these correlations were significantly positive, three, restricted to the normal range of hemoglobin, were significantly negative. All but one of the other correlations showed a negative trend. New analyses of previously published data sets resulted in similar findings. In particular a new analysis of large data sets of males (n = 2417) and females (n = 2592) with normal range hemoglobin levels, revealed significantly negative correlations. A meta-analysis of our results indicated that the data overall are not consistent with a positive relationship between hemoglobin and erythropoietin (P < 0.0001). Population data indicate that individuals do not have set point levels of hemoglobin.

AB - Hemoglobin levels are believed to be regulated as per a set point model of regulation. This model of regulation, by which specific levels of a parameter are targeted and defended by physiological systems, implies a particular population correlation between the parameter and its controlling hormone. Empirical population correlations of other parameters and their controlling hormones, have denied the presence of such set point-based regulation. To assess if hemoglobin is regulated according to a set point model we performed a systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Web of Science identifying relevant reports published up to November 2018. Population hemoglobin/erythropoietin level correlations were retrieved, and these empirically derived correlations were compared with the positive correlation implied by a set point model of regulation. Authors of papers containing potentially suitable data were contacted with requests for further analyses, and a meta-analysis was performed. Twelve correlations between hemoglobin and erythropoietin levels from eleven papers were analyzed. None of these correlations were significantly positive, three, restricted to the normal range of hemoglobin, were significantly negative. All but one of the other correlations showed a negative trend. New analyses of previously published data sets resulted in similar findings. In particular a new analysis of large data sets of males (n = 2417) and females (n = 2592) with normal range hemoglobin levels, revealed significantly negative correlations. A meta-analysis of our results indicated that the data overall are not consistent with a positive relationship between hemoglobin and erythropoietin (P < 0.0001). Population data indicate that individuals do not have set point levels of hemoglobin.

KW - Erythropoietin

KW - haemoglobin

KW - population correlations

KW - set point

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068069382&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.14814/phy2.14153

DO - 10.14814/phy2.14153

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Physiological Reports

JF - Physiological Reports

SN - 2051-817X

IS - 12

M1 - e14153

ER -