Predictors of Resilient Psycological Functioning in Western Australian Aboriginal Young People Exposed to High Family-Level Risk

Katrina Hopkins, Catherine Taylor, Heather D'Antoine, Stephen Zubrick

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The authors review results from a study in Western Australia of stress exposure and resilience among Aboriginal children and young people who come from families where there is violence. The findings are provocative given the social and economic marginalization the youth face. Results show that the youth who are the most resilient are those who report less adherence to their culture and come from lower rather than higher socioeconomic households.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Social Ecology of Resilience
    EditorsMichael Ungar
    Place of PublicationCanada
    PublisherSpringer
    Chapter33
    Pages425-440
    Number of pages16
    ISBN (Print)9781461405856
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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  • Cite this

    Hopkins, K., Taylor, C., D'Antoine, H., & Zubrick, S. (2012). Predictors of Resilient Psycological Functioning in Western Australian Aboriginal Young People Exposed to High Family-Level Risk. In M. Ungar (Ed.), The Social Ecology of Resilience (pp. 425-440). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0586-3_33