Presence and breeding of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater in central New South Wales

John Rawsthorne

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The seasonal presence and breeding of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Acanthagenys rufogularis, a nomadic frugivorous bird distributed across inland Australia, are documented and contrasted for three nearby but floristically distinct sites in central New South Wales during the period January 1986-January 2015. Eucalypt blossom at two of the sites (Charcoal Tank and Holy Camp) provided an autumn resource to which the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater responded with influxes, but these sites supported limited breeding of this species, and only in higher-rainfall periods. In contrast, the high density of Grey Mistletoe Amyema quandang parasitising Weeping Myall Acacia pendula at the third study site (Battery Hill) provided a stable resource supporting breeding resident Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters in a lower-rainfall year.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)97-101
    Number of pages5
    JournalAustralian Field Ornithology
    Volume33
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

    Fingerprint

    New South Wales
    breeding
    Acacia pendula
    Santalales
    Amyema
    rain
    rainfall
    resource
    charcoal
    parasitism
    autumn
    bird
    birds
    camp
    battery

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The seasonal presence and breeding of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Acanthagenys rufogularis, a nomadic frugivorous bird distributed across inland Australia, are documented and contrasted for three nearby but floristically distinct sites in central New South Wales during the period January 1986-January 2015. Eucalypt blossom at two of the sites (Charcoal Tank and Holy Camp) provided an autumn resource to which the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater responded with influxes, but these sites supported limited breeding of this species, and only in higher-rainfall periods. In contrast, the high density of Grey Mistletoe Amyema quandang parasitising Weeping Myall Acacia pendula at the third study site (Battery Hill) provided a stable resource supporting breeding resident Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters in a lower-rainfall year.",
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    Presence and breeding of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater in central New South Wales. / Rawsthorne, John.

    In: Australian Field Ornithology, Vol. 33, 12.2016, p. 97-101.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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