Prevalence and Associations of General Practice Registrars’ Management of Impetigo: A CrossSectional Analysis From the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) Study

Hilary Gorges, Clare Heal, Mieke L. Van Driel, Amanda Tapley, Joshua Davis, Andrew Davey, Elizabeth G. Holliday, Jean Ball, Nashwa Najib, Neil A. Spike, Kristen Fitzgerald, Parker J. Magin

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Abstract

Background: Impetigo is a mild bacterial skin infection of childhood that is usually managed empirically in primary care.

Objective: To establish the prevalence and associations of impetigo in general practice (GP) registrars’ consultations.

Methods:
Cross-sectional analysis of the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study data.

Results: Impetigo was managed in 0.24% of problems and 0.43% of consultations. Patient variables associated with impetigo presentations were younger age and impetigo as a new problem, while patients with non–English-speaking backgrounds were less likely to present with impetigo. Associated registrar variables were being new to the registrar and practicing in outer regional/remote locations. Compared with all other problems/diagnoses, impetigo more often involved information seeking, ordering pathology, and prescription of medication, but less often involved follow-up or referral.

Conclusions: Impetigo accounts for 0.43 per 100 GP registrar consultations in Australia. Association with outer regional/remote areas may reflect climate and socioeconomic factors that predispose to impetigo. Associated pathology requests may reflect a lack of confidence in GP registrars’ management of impetigo. Cultural differences may exist regarding health-seeking behavior relating to impetigo.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2020043
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalDermatology Parctical and Conceptual
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2020

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