Prevalence of depression and its associations with cardio-metabolic control in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt patients with type 2 diabetes

The Fremantle Diabetes study Phase II

Timothy Davis, Kerry Hunt, David G Bruce, Sergio Starkstein, Timothy Skinner, Daniel McAullay, Wendy Austin Davis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Aims: To determine the prevalence and associates of depression in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt (AC) Australians with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: Community-based patients were screened using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as part of detailed assessment. The prevalence of any current depression, major depression and antidepressant use by racial group was compared after adjustment for age, sex, educational attainment and marital status. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine associates of current depression.

    Results: The 107 Aboriginal participants were younger (mean ± SD 54.3 ± 11.8 vs 67.2 ± 10.6 years), less often male (34.6% vs 50.9%) and married (39.3% vs 61.7%), and more likely to smoke (44.6% vs 8.1%) than the 793 AC subjects (P ≤ 0.002). Fifty-two Aboriginal (48.5%) and 772 AC participants (97.4%) completed the PHQ-9; these Aboriginals had similar socio-demographic, anthropometric and diabetes-related characteristics to those without PHQ-9 data. A quarter of the Aboriginals had current depression vs 10.6% of ACs (P = 0.16), 15.4% vs 4.1% had major depression (P = 0.029), and 68.8% vs 29.7% had untreated depression (P = 0.032). Compared with non-depressed participants, patients with current depression were younger and more likely to smoke, to be overweight/obese and to have worse glycaemic control (P ≤ 0.024). Significant independent associates of current depression were educational attainment (inversely), smoking status, body mass index and fasting plasma glucose in the AC group and alcohol use in the Aboriginal group.

    Conclusions: Although prevalence of depression was not significantly increased in the Aboriginal patients, it was more likely to be major and untreated. Depression complicating type 2 diabetes is associated with adverse cardiovascular risk.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)384-391
    Number of pages8
    JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
    Volume107
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

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    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Depression
    Smoke
    Educational Status
    Marital Status
    Antidepressive Agents
    Fasting
    Body Mass Index
    Logistic Models
    Smoking
    Alcohols
    Demography
    Glucose
    Health

    Cite this

    Davis, Timothy ; Hunt, Kerry ; Bruce, David G ; Starkstein, Sergio ; Skinner, Timothy ; McAullay, Daniel ; Davis, Wendy Austin. / Prevalence of depression and its associations with cardio-metabolic control in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt patients with type 2 diabetes : The Fremantle Diabetes study Phase II. In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2015 ; Vol. 107, No. 3. pp. 384-391.
    @article{6c3ff806a2944622abaa56fe4b9cfffe,
    title = "Prevalence of depression and its associations with cardio-metabolic control in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt patients with type 2 diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes study Phase II",
    abstract = "Aims: To determine the prevalence and associates of depression in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt (AC) Australians with type 2 diabetes.Methods: Community-based patients were screened using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as part of detailed assessment. The prevalence of any current depression, major depression and antidepressant use by racial group was compared after adjustment for age, sex, educational attainment and marital status. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine associates of current depression.Results: The 107 Aboriginal participants were younger (mean ± SD 54.3 ± 11.8 vs 67.2 ± 10.6 years), less often male (34.6{\%} vs 50.9{\%}) and married (39.3{\%} vs 61.7{\%}), and more likely to smoke (44.6{\%} vs 8.1{\%}) than the 793 AC subjects (P ≤ 0.002). Fifty-two Aboriginal (48.5{\%}) and 772 AC participants (97.4{\%}) completed the PHQ-9; these Aboriginals had similar socio-demographic, anthropometric and diabetes-related characteristics to those without PHQ-9 data. A quarter of the Aboriginals had current depression vs 10.6{\%} of ACs (P = 0.16), 15.4{\%} vs 4.1{\%} had major depression (P = 0.029), and 68.8{\%} vs 29.7{\%} had untreated depression (P = 0.032). Compared with non-depressed participants, patients with current depression were younger and more likely to smoke, to be overweight/obese and to have worse glycaemic control (P ≤ 0.024). Significant independent associates of current depression were educational attainment (inversely), smoking status, body mass index and fasting plasma glucose in the AC group and alcohol use in the Aboriginal group.Conclusions: Although prevalence of depression was not significantly increased in the Aboriginal patients, it was more likely to be major and untreated. Depression complicating type 2 diabetes is associated with adverse cardiovascular risk.",
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    author = "Timothy Davis and Kerry Hunt and Bruce, {David G} and Sergio Starkstein and Timothy Skinner and Daniel McAullay and Davis, {Wendy Austin}",
    year = "2015",
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    Prevalence of depression and its associations with cardio-metabolic control in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt patients with type 2 diabetes : The Fremantle Diabetes study Phase II. / Davis, Timothy; Hunt, Kerry; Bruce, David G; Starkstein, Sergio; Skinner, Timothy; McAullay, Daniel; Davis, Wendy Austin.

    In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 107, No. 3, 03.2015, p. 384-391.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Prevalence of depression and its associations with cardio-metabolic control in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt patients with type 2 diabetes

    T2 - The Fremantle Diabetes study Phase II

    AU - Davis, Timothy

    AU - Hunt, Kerry

    AU - Bruce, David G

    AU - Starkstein, Sergio

    AU - Skinner, Timothy

    AU - McAullay, Daniel

    AU - Davis, Wendy Austin

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    N2 - Aims: To determine the prevalence and associates of depression in Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt (AC) Australians with type 2 diabetes.Methods: Community-based patients were screened using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as part of detailed assessment. The prevalence of any current depression, major depression and antidepressant use by racial group was compared after adjustment for age, sex, educational attainment and marital status. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine associates of current depression.Results: The 107 Aboriginal participants were younger (mean ± SD 54.3 ± 11.8 vs 67.2 ± 10.6 years), less often male (34.6% vs 50.9%) and married (39.3% vs 61.7%), and more likely to smoke (44.6% vs 8.1%) than the 793 AC subjects (P ≤ 0.002). Fifty-two Aboriginal (48.5%) and 772 AC participants (97.4%) completed the PHQ-9; these Aboriginals had similar socio-demographic, anthropometric and diabetes-related characteristics to those without PHQ-9 data. A quarter of the Aboriginals had current depression vs 10.6% of ACs (P = 0.16), 15.4% vs 4.1% had major depression (P = 0.029), and 68.8% vs 29.7% had untreated depression (P = 0.032). Compared with non-depressed participants, patients with current depression were younger and more likely to smoke, to be overweight/obese and to have worse glycaemic control (P ≤ 0.024). Significant independent associates of current depression were educational attainment (inversely), smoking status, body mass index and fasting plasma glucose in the AC group and alcohol use in the Aboriginal group.Conclusions: Although prevalence of depression was not significantly increased in the Aboriginal patients, it was more likely to be major and untreated. Depression complicating type 2 diabetes is associated with adverse cardiovascular risk.

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