Principles That Underpin Effective School-Based Drug Education

Richard Midford, G Munro, N McBride, Pamela Snow, Ursula Ladzinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study identifies the conceptual underpinnings of effective school-based drug education practice in light of contemporary research evidence and the practical experience of a broad range of drug education stakeholders. The research involved a review of the literature, a national survey of 210 Australian teachers and others involved in drug education, and structured interviews with 22 key Australian drug education policy stakeholders. The findings from this research have been distilled and presented as a list of 16 principles that underpin effective drug education. In broad terms, drug education should be evidence-based, developmentally appropriate, sequential, and contextual. Programs should be initiated before drug use commences. Strategies should be linked to goals and should incorporate harm minimization. Teaching should be interactive and use peer leaders. The role of the classroom teacher is central. Certain program content is important, as is social and resistance skills training. Community values, the social context of use, and the nature of drug harm have to be addressed. Coverage needs to be adequate and supported by follow-up. It is envisaged that these principles will provide all those involved in the drug education field with a set of up-to-date, research-based guidelines against which to reference decisions on program design, selection, implementation, and evaluation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-386
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Drug Education
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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drug
Education
Pharmaceutical Preparations
school
education
Research
stakeholder
Harm Reduction
teacher
Resistance Training
evidence
drug use
coverage
Teaching
leader
Guidelines
Interviews
classroom
interview
evaluation

Cite this

Midford, R., Munro, G., McBride, N., Snow, P., & Ladzinski, U. (2002). Principles That Underpin Effective School-Based Drug Education. Journal of Drug Education, 32(4), 363-386. https://doi.org/10.2190/T66J-YDBX-J256-J8T9
Midford, Richard ; Munro, G ; McBride, N ; Snow, Pamela ; Ladzinski, Ursula. / Principles That Underpin Effective School-Based Drug Education. In: Journal of Drug Education. 2002 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 363-386.
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Midford, R, Munro, G, McBride, N, Snow, P & Ladzinski, U 2002, 'Principles That Underpin Effective School-Based Drug Education', Journal of Drug Education, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 363-386. https://doi.org/10.2190/T66J-YDBX-J256-J8T9

Principles That Underpin Effective School-Based Drug Education. / Midford, Richard; Munro, G; McBride, N; Snow, Pamela; Ladzinski, Ursula.

In: Journal of Drug Education, Vol. 32, No. 4, 2002, p. 363-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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