Production of cuttings in response to stock plant temperature in the subtropical eucalypts, Corymbia citriodora and Eucalyptus dunnii

Stephen Trueman, Tracey McMahon, Mila Bristow

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Propagation of subtropical eucalypts is often limited by low production of rooted cuttings in winter. This study tested whether changing the temperature of Corymbia citriodora and Eucalyptus dunnii stock plants from 28/23°C (day/night) to 18/13°C, 23/18°C or 33/28°C affected the production of cuttings by stock plants, the concentrations of Ca and other nutrients in cuttings, and the subsequent percentages of cuttings that formed roots. Optimal temperatures for shoot production were 33/28°C and 28/23°C, with lower temperatures reducing the number of harvested cuttings. Stock plant temperature regulated production of rooted cuttings, firstly by controlling shoot production and, secondly, by affecting the ensuing rooting percentage. Shoot production was the primary factor regulating rooted cutting production by C. citriodora, but both shoot production and root production were key determinants of rooted cutting production in E. dunnii. Effects of lower stock plant temperatures on rooting were not the result of reduced Ca concentration, but consistent relationships were found between adventitious root formation and B concentration. Average rooting percentages were low (1–15% for C. citriodora and 2–22% for E. dunnii) but rooted cutting production per stock plant (e.g. 25 for C. citriodora and 52 for E. dunnii over 14 weeks at 33/28°C) was sufficient to establish clonal field tests for plantation forestry.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)265-279
    Number of pages15
    JournalNew Forests
    Volume44
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Production of cuttings in response to stock plant temperature in the subtropical eucalypts, Corymbia citriodora and Eucalyptus dunnii'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this