Productivity is negatively related to shoot growth across five mango cultivars in the seasonally wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

Ping Lu, Elias Chacko, Sean Bithell, Heinz Schaper, Josef Wiebel, Steve Cole, Warren Muller

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Introduction: Mango productivity is low in seasonally wet-dry tropical areas where breeding programs require information on factors affecting productivity of mango cultivars. Specifically, our study tested a novel hypothesis that, among Australian- and Florida-bred cultivars, the greater growth of vegetatively vigorous cultivars would contribute to lower levels of fruit production in comparison with less vegetatively vigorous cultivars, in a wet-dry tropical environment.

    Materials and methods:
    A field experiment was conducted on trees of the cultivars ‘Kensington Pride’ and ‘Strawberry’, both polyembryonic cultivars, and ‘Haden’, ‘Irwin’ and ‘Tommy Atkins’, all monoembryonic cultivars.

    Results: Shoot growth was recorded over two years; in both years the polyembryonic cultivars produced more new shoot length than the monoembryonic cultivars; ‘Irwin’ was the least vigorous cultivar in both years. Across cultivars, there was a negative relationship between normalised (by flowering intensity and canopy area) fruit number or yield and vegetative vigour as represented by new shoot length.

    Conclusion: The results supported the hypothesis that the greater shoot growth of vegetatively vigorous cultivars contributed to lower levels of fruit production in comparison with less vegetatively vigorous cultivars in a tropical environment. This is the first study which demonstrates that the extent of seasonal shoot growth had a fruit production cost for mango.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)279-289
    Number of pages11
    JournalFruits
    Volume68
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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