Programa Tern: Protocolo de estudio para la implementación de un ensayo clínico flexible, intervención psicosocial a largo plazo para el estrés postraumático complejo en jóvenes

Translated title of the contribution: The Tern Programme Study protocol for an implementation trial of a flexible, long-term psychosocial intervention for complex posttraumatic stress in young people

Braden J. Dunn, Carol A. Keane, Jessica L. Paterson

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    Abstract

    Background: Complex Trauma (CT) is a term used to refer to multiple or prolonged traumatic experiences. Such experiences are often first encountered during childhood and may impact key developmental periods. CT is a risk for a broad range of deleterious physical, psychological, social, and occupational outcomes. The diagnosis of Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) has been proposed to capture the symptomatology resulting from CT exposure. In Australia, there are few publicly funded services that target, and are purposely designed to support, the mental health needs of young people with symptoms of complex post-traumatic stress (C-PTSD). The Tern Programme has been designed as a purpose-built model of care for providing mental health support to young people with C-PTSD. 

    Methods: This implementation trial will involve a longitudinal examination of Tern participants for a fixed 24-month period. Participants will be recruited from the young people referred to Tern at headspace centres in regional Australia where Tern operates. Eligible participants will have reported a history of complex trauma, and present with symptoms of C-PTSD. All participants will be invited to complete a series of surveys during their participation in the programme. Survey items will assess C-PTSD symptom change, quality of life and occupational functioning. The Tern model of care is delivered in a semi-structured format to accommodate a person-centred flexible approach. Fidelity will be monitored through the completion of a clinician post-session checklist and through group supervision. 

    Discussion: This study will provide the first quantitative data on the new Tern model of care and evaluate mental health and functional outcomes of its participants. If effective, Tern may be suitable for replication in other Australian or international youth mental health services where complex post-traumatic stress is prevalent. Trial Registration: Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12621000079842p. Prospectively registered on 29 January 2021. Abbreviations: CT = Complex Trauma; C-PTSD = Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Translated title of the contributionThe Tern Programme Study protocol for an implementation trial of a flexible, long-term psychosocial intervention for complex posttraumatic stress in young people
    Original languageSpanish
    Article number1988479
    Number of pages17
    JournalEuropean Journal of Psychotraumatology
    Volume12
    Issue number1
    Early online dateNov 2021
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    We gratefully acknowledge and thank Northern Australia Primary Health Limited for commissioning and funding this research project alongside CQUniversity. Without your support the realisation of Tern would not be possible. We would like to thank Phil Ihme and Kirsten Seymour for the original concept and in securing this research partnership. We would like to thank Barbara Anderson for her contribution to the design of the Tern intervention and teaching us trauma-informed care. We would like to thank Gillian Lunn, Ashlea Sutton and Sandy Revel for the design and implementation of the Tern Skills Group. We would like to thank Rachel Taylor for her contribution and feedback to research ethics and the Tern triage system. Lastly, we would like to thank all other past and future practitioners of Tern, and of course, all the young people who have participated on this journey with us.

    Funding Information:
    Tern will be conducted at two regional youth community mental health centres in Queensland, Australia: headspace Townsville and headspace Mackay. The ‘headspace Centre’ model of youth mental healthcare has been adopted nationally and is funded by the Australian Federal Government Department of Health (McGorry et al., ). Core objectives of the headspace model are to overcome issues of access for young people, and to provide a youth-friendly, no- or low-cost integrated mental health service within the space of primary healthcare. Interested readers are directed to Rickwood et al. (Rickwood et al., ) for a full discussion of the headspace model and history.

    Funding Information:
    Research funding has been granted by Northern Australia Primary Health Limited and CQUniversity in the form of the Elevate Scholarship. These monies fund BJD?s time to conduct necessary research activities for this trial. We would also like to acknowledge the North Queensland Primary Health Network who have provided funding for the clinical staffing and general project management of Tern;Central Queensland University. We gratefully acknowledge and thank Northern Australia Primary Health Limited for commissioning and funding this research project alongside CQUniversity. Without your support the realisation of Tern would not be possible. We would like to thank Phil Ihme and Kirsten Seymour for the original concept and in securing this research partnership. We would like to thank Barbara Anderson for her contribution to the design of the Tern intervention and teaching us trauma-informed care. We would like to thank Gillian Lunn, Ashlea Sutton and Sandy Revel for the design and implementation of the Tern Skills Group. We would like to thank Rachel Taylor for her contribution and feedback to research ethics and the Tern triage system. Lastly, we would like to thank all other past and future practitioners of Tern, and of course, all the young people who have participated on this journey with us.

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

    Copyright:
    Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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