Progressive increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Indigenous populations in northern Australia from 1993 to 2012

Steven Tong, liana Varrone, Mark Chatfield, M Beaman, Philip Giffard

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Hospital-based studies have determined high rates of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Indigenous populations. However, there is a paucity of community-based data. We obtained 20 years (1993-2012) of data on S. aureus isolates (N = 20 210) collected from community clinics that provide services for Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, Australia. Methicillin resistance increased from 7% to 24%, resistance to macrolides remained stable at ~25%, and there was a slight increase in resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The increase in methicillin resistance is concerning for the Indigenous communities represented by this data, but it is also of significance if virulent MRSA clones emerge and spread more widely from such settings.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1519-1523
    Number of pages5
    JournalEpidemiology and Infection
    Volume143
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    Population Groups
    Methicillin Resistance
    Northern Territory
    Macrolides
    Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
    Staphylococcus aureus
    Clone Cells

    Cite this

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    title = "Progressive increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Indigenous populations in northern Australia from 1993 to 2012",
    abstract = "Hospital-based studies have determined high rates of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Indigenous populations. However, there is a paucity of community-based data. We obtained 20 years (1993-2012) of data on S. aureus isolates (N = 20 210) collected from community clinics that provide services for Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, Australia. Methicillin resistance increased from 7{\%} to 24{\%}, resistance to macrolides remained stable at ~25{\%}, and there was a slight increase in resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The increase in methicillin resistance is concerning for the Indigenous communities represented by this data, but it is also of significance if virulent MRSA clones emerge and spread more widely from such settings.",
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    author = "Steven Tong and liana Varrone and Mark Chatfield and M Beaman and Philip Giffard",
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    language = "English",
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    Progressive increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Indigenous populations in northern Australia from 1993 to 2012. / Tong, Steven; Varrone, liana; Chatfield, Mark; Beaman, M; Giffard, Philip.

    In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 143, No. 7, 2015, p. 1519-1523.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Tong, Steven

    AU - Varrone, liana

    AU - Chatfield, Mark

    AU - Beaman, M

    AU - Giffard, Philip

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