Pulmonary cytochrome P450 enzymes belonging to the CYP4B subfamily from an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)

Natalie L. Milic, Suong N.T. Ngo, Ceilidh L. Marchant, Tamara A. Height, Ross A. McKinnon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. We have previously reported the cloning and characterisation of the koala CYP4A15, the first reported member of the CYP4 family from marsupials, and have demonstrated important species differences in CYP4A activity and tissue expression. In the present study, the cloning of CYP4B1 in the wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and their expression across marsupials is described. Rabbit anti-mouse CYP4B1 antibody detected immunoreactive proteins in lung and liver microsomes from all test marsupials, with relative weak signal detected from the koala, suggesting a species-specific expression. Microsomal 2-aminofluorene bio-activation (a CYP4B1 marker) in wallaby lung was comparable to that of rabbit, with significant higher activities detected in wallaby liver and kidneys compared to rabbit. A 1548 bp wallaby lung CYP4B complete cDNA, designated CYP4B1, which encodes a protein of 510 amino acids and shares 72% nucleotide and 69% amino acid sequence identity to human CYP4B1, was cloned by polymerase chain reaction approaches. The results demonstrate the presence of wallaby CYP4B1 that shares several common features with other published CYP4Bs; however the wallaby CYP4B1 cDNA contains four extra amino acid residues at the NH2-terminal, a fundamentally conserved transmembrane anchor of all eukaryote CYPs.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)60-66
    Number of pages7
    JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology, Part C
    Volume153
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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