Q-fever and Australian farmers: is the health system paying enough attention? A literature review

Hana Morrissey, Jacqueline Cotton, Patrick Ball

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Introduction: Q-fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative bacterium and Rickettsia-like organism. Transmitted from wild and domestic animals to humans, the most common route is inhalation of contaminated dust; however the oral route can be considered as a second pathway. Aim: to understand the reasons behind not including farming workforce and their families in the national vaccinations program. Discussion: In 1977 Q-fever became a notifiable disease nationally. Australia is the only country to have a registered Q-fever vaccine. As a result of the cost of the vaccine, Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA) supply and subsidised program arrangements are based on the active cases count per year (by occupation), rather than for occupations that expose workers to high level of possible "risk". Conclusion: Australian farmers, farm managers, farm workers and their families need to be well educated about Q-fever and included in the national vaccination program.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)64-67
    Number of pages4
    JournalAustralian Journal of Pharmacy
    Volume95
    Issue number1130
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

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