Re-identifying the student

An essential step in reducing VET to binary code

Don Zoellner

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Research

    Abstract

    The emergence of a modern VET learner has been presented as natural and a challenge to contemporary employers, training providers and society in general. This presentation explores how this has come about and what purposes are being served. In particular the national training system finds binary distinctions difficult to resist and not understanding the performativity and classificatory activities that have created the modern learner may produce unsuitable styles and types of learning and teaching that are driven by non-vocational aspirations. At best, uncritical acceptance of technologically mediated learning may limit the range of teaching methods used in the sector and, at worst, may completely ignore essential learning experiences that can only be found in operational workplaces and occupationally-grounded knowledge.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages1-14
    Number of pages14
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    EventAustralian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference - Sydney TAFE (Ultimo campus, Sydney, Australia
    Duration: 8 Dec 20169 Dec 2016

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference
    CountryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period8/12/169/12/16

    Fingerprint

    learning
    student
    method of teaching
    employer
    workplace
    acceptance
    Teaching
    experience
    Society

    Cite this

    Zoellner, D. (2016). Re-identifying the student: An essential step in reducing VET to binary code. 1-14. Paper presented at Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference, Sydney, Australia.
    Zoellner, Don. / Re-identifying the student : An essential step in reducing VET to binary code. Paper presented at Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference, Sydney, Australia.14 p.
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    Zoellner, D 2016, 'Re-identifying the student: An essential step in reducing VET to binary code' Paper presented at Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference, Sydney, Australia, 8/12/16 - 9/12/16, pp. 1-14.

    Re-identifying the student : An essential step in reducing VET to binary code. / Zoellner, Don.

    2016. 1-14 Paper presented at Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference, Sydney, Australia.

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Research

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    Zoellner D. Re-identifying the student: An essential step in reducing VET to binary code. 2016. Paper presented at Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group Conference, Sydney, Australia.