Refugees rejuvenating and connecting communities: An analysis of the social, cultural and economic contributions of Hazara humanitarian migrants in the Port Adelaide-Enfield area of Adelaide, South Australia (full report)

George Tan, David Radford, Branka Krivokapic, Heidi Hetz, Hannah Soong, Rosie Roberts

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

Negative Australian media and political discourse concerning refugees have often portrayed them as a burden, cost or threat to the Australian community, and/or unable or unwilling to integrate into the broader Australian community because of their (‘illegal’) means of arrival, or their cultural, religious and educational characteristics. It has been argued, however, that refugees make very positive economic, social and civic contributions to host societies (Hugo et al. 2011; Collins 2013). Underpinning this research is an understanding that living and engaging in a community is multifaceted. That engagement must be considered in a holistic way that looks at social, cultural and economic factors. Engagement, contribution or impact cannot simply be measured or understood as a dollar figure, that is, how a group of people help the economic position of the community.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAdelaide
PublisherUniversity of South Australia
Commissioning bodyMulticultural Communities Council of South Australia (MCCSA)
Number of pages136
ISBN (Electronic)9781922046345
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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