Removing the rubbish

frogs eliminate foreign objects from the body cavity through the bladder

Christopher Tracy, Keith Christian, Christopher Gienger

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    During the course of a telemetry study on three species of Australian frogs (Litoria caerulea, Litoria dahlii and Cyclorana australis), we found that many of the surgically implanted transmitters had migrated into the bladder. We subsequently implanted small beads into L. caerulea and they were expelled from the body in 10-23 days. Beads implanted into cane toads (Rhinella marina) to document the process were either expelled or were enveloped into the bladder. This appears to be a unique pathway for expulsion of foreign objects from the body, and suggests that caution should be employed in telemetry studies when interpreting the separation of some animals from their transmitters as a mortality event.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)465-467
    Number of pages3
    JournalBiology Letters
    Volume7
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    Bufo marinus
    Telemetry
    body cavities
    telemetry
    Foreign Bodies
    bladder
    Anura
    frogs
    Urinary Bladder
    Canes
    Mortality
    animals
    Litoria

    Cite this

    Tracy, Christopher ; Christian, Keith ; Gienger, Christopher. / Removing the rubbish : frogs eliminate foreign objects from the body cavity through the bladder. In: Biology Letters. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 465-467.
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    Removing the rubbish : frogs eliminate foreign objects from the body cavity through the bladder. / Tracy, Christopher; Christian, Keith; Gienger, Christopher.

    In: Biology Letters, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2011, p. 465-467.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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