Responses of motor-sport athletes to V8 supercar racing in hot conditions

M Brearley, James Finn

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Despite the thermal challenge of demanding workloads performed in high cabin temperatures while wearing heavy heat-retardant clothing, information on physiological responses to racing V8 Supercars in hot conditions is not readily available. PURPOSE: To describe the thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain on V8 Supercar drivers competing in hot conditions. METHODS: Thermal strain was indicated by body-core temperature using an ingested thermosensitive pill. Cardiovascular strain was assessed from heart rate, hydration status, and sweat rate. Perceptual strain was estimated from self-rated thermal sensation, thermal discomfort (modified Gagge scales), perceived exertion (Borg scale), and perceptual strain index. RESULTS: Prerace body-core temperatures were (mean +/- SD) 37.7 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 37.0 degrees C to 38.2 degrees C), rising to 39.0 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 38.4 degrees C to 39.7 degrees C) postrace. Driver heart rates were >160 and >170 beats/min for 85.3% and 46.7% of racing, respectively. Sweat rates were 1.06 +/- 0.12 L/h or 13.4 +/- 1.2 mL . kg-1 . h-1, and postrace dehydration was 0.6% +/- 0.6% of prerace body mass. Drivers rated thermal sensation as hot (10.3 +/- 0.9), thermal discomfort as uncomfortable (3.1 +/- 1.0), and perceived exertion as very hard to very, very hard (8.7 +/- 1.7) after the races. Overall physiological and perceptual strain were 7.4 +/- 1.0 and 7.1 +/- 1.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of cooling, V8 Supercar drivers endure thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain during brief driving bouts in hot conditions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)182-191
    Number of pages10
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
    Volume2
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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    Athletes
    Sports
    Hot Temperature
    Sweat
    Body Temperature
    Heart Rate
    Clothing
    Workload
    Dehydration
    Temperature

    Cite this

    @article{630497c8e17c467299611217753c2f05,
    title = "Responses of motor-sport athletes to V8 supercar racing in hot conditions",
    abstract = "BACKGROUND: Despite the thermal challenge of demanding workloads performed in high cabin temperatures while wearing heavy heat-retardant clothing, information on physiological responses to racing V8 Supercars in hot conditions is not readily available. PURPOSE: To describe the thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain on V8 Supercar drivers competing in hot conditions. METHODS: Thermal strain was indicated by body-core temperature using an ingested thermosensitive pill. Cardiovascular strain was assessed from heart rate, hydration status, and sweat rate. Perceptual strain was estimated from self-rated thermal sensation, thermal discomfort (modified Gagge scales), perceived exertion (Borg scale), and perceptual strain index. RESULTS: Prerace body-core temperatures were (mean +/- SD) 37.7 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 37.0 degrees C to 38.2 degrees C), rising to 39.0 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 38.4 degrees C to 39.7 degrees C) postrace. Driver heart rates were >160 and >170 beats/min for 85.3{\%} and 46.7{\%} of racing, respectively. Sweat rates were 1.06 +/- 0.12 L/h or 13.4 +/- 1.2 mL . kg-1 . h-1, and postrace dehydration was 0.6{\%} +/- 0.6{\%} of prerace body mass. Drivers rated thermal sensation as hot (10.3 +/- 0.9), thermal discomfort as uncomfortable (3.1 +/- 1.0), and perceived exertion as very hard to very, very hard (8.7 +/- 1.7) after the races. Overall physiological and perceptual strain were 7.4 +/- 1.0 and 7.1 +/- 1.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of cooling, V8 Supercar drivers endure thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain during brief driving bouts in hot conditions.",
    keywords = "adaptation, adult, article, car driving, competitive behavior, heat, heat injury, human, male, physiology, sport, telemetry, thermoregulation, Adaptation, Physiological, Adult, Automobile Driving, Body Temperature Regulation, Competitive Behavior, Heat Stress Disorders, Hot Temperature, Humans, Male, Sports, Telemetry",
    author = "M Brearley and James Finn",
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    Responses of motor-sport athletes to V8 supercar racing in hot conditions. / Brearley, M; Finn, James.

    In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2007, p. 182-191.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Responses of motor-sport athletes to V8 supercar racing in hot conditions

    AU - Brearley, M

    AU - Finn, James

    PY - 2007

    Y1 - 2007

    N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the thermal challenge of demanding workloads performed in high cabin temperatures while wearing heavy heat-retardant clothing, information on physiological responses to racing V8 Supercars in hot conditions is not readily available. PURPOSE: To describe the thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain on V8 Supercar drivers competing in hot conditions. METHODS: Thermal strain was indicated by body-core temperature using an ingested thermosensitive pill. Cardiovascular strain was assessed from heart rate, hydration status, and sweat rate. Perceptual strain was estimated from self-rated thermal sensation, thermal discomfort (modified Gagge scales), perceived exertion (Borg scale), and perceptual strain index. RESULTS: Prerace body-core temperatures were (mean +/- SD) 37.7 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 37.0 degrees C to 38.2 degrees C), rising to 39.0 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 38.4 degrees C to 39.7 degrees C) postrace. Driver heart rates were >160 and >170 beats/min for 85.3% and 46.7% of racing, respectively. Sweat rates were 1.06 +/- 0.12 L/h or 13.4 +/- 1.2 mL . kg-1 . h-1, and postrace dehydration was 0.6% +/- 0.6% of prerace body mass. Drivers rated thermal sensation as hot (10.3 +/- 0.9), thermal discomfort as uncomfortable (3.1 +/- 1.0), and perceived exertion as very hard to very, very hard (8.7 +/- 1.7) after the races. Overall physiological and perceptual strain were 7.4 +/- 1.0 and 7.1 +/- 1.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of cooling, V8 Supercar drivers endure thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain during brief driving bouts in hot conditions.

    AB - BACKGROUND: Despite the thermal challenge of demanding workloads performed in high cabin temperatures while wearing heavy heat-retardant clothing, information on physiological responses to racing V8 Supercars in hot conditions is not readily available. PURPOSE: To describe the thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain on V8 Supercar drivers competing in hot conditions. METHODS: Thermal strain was indicated by body-core temperature using an ingested thermosensitive pill. Cardiovascular strain was assessed from heart rate, hydration status, and sweat rate. Perceptual strain was estimated from self-rated thermal sensation, thermal discomfort (modified Gagge scales), perceived exertion (Borg scale), and perceptual strain index. RESULTS: Prerace body-core temperatures were (mean +/- SD) 37.7 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 37.0 degrees C to 38.2 degrees C), rising to 39.0 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C (range 38.4 degrees C to 39.7 degrees C) postrace. Driver heart rates were >160 and >170 beats/min for 85.3% and 46.7% of racing, respectively. Sweat rates were 1.06 +/- 0.12 L/h or 13.4 +/- 1.2 mL . kg-1 . h-1, and postrace dehydration was 0.6% +/- 0.6% of prerace body mass. Drivers rated thermal sensation as hot (10.3 +/- 0.9), thermal discomfort as uncomfortable (3.1 +/- 1.0), and perceived exertion as very hard to very, very hard (8.7 +/- 1.7) after the races. Overall physiological and perceptual strain were 7.4 +/- 1.0 and 7.1 +/- 1.2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of cooling, V8 Supercar drivers endure thermal, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain during brief driving bouts in hot conditions.

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    KW - male

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    KW - Adaptation, Physiological

    KW - Adult

    KW - Automobile Driving

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    KW - Competitive Behavior

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    JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

    JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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