Restricted movements of juvenile rays in the lagoon of Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia - evidence for the existence of a nursery

F. Cerutti-Pereyra, Michele Thums, C. M. Austin, C. J A Bradshaw, John D Stevens, R. C. Babcock, Richard D Pillans, M. G. Meekan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Little information is available on the movements and behaviour of tropical rays despite their potential ecological roles and economic value as a fishery and a tourism resource. A description of the movement patterns and site fidelity of juvenile rays within a coral reef environment is provided in this study. Acoustic telemetry was used to focus on the use of potential nursery areas and describe movement patterns of 16 individuals of four species monitored for 1-21 months within an array of 51 listening stations deployed across a lagoon, reef crest, and reef slope at Mangrove Bay, Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia. Juveniles used a small (< 1 km2), shallow (1-2 m depth) embayment where three receivers recorded 60-80 % of total detections of tagged animals, although individuals of all species moved throughout the array and beyond the lagoon to the open reef slope. Detections at these primary sites were more frequent during winter and when water temperatures were highest during the day. Long-term use of coastal lagoons by juvenile rays suggests that they provide an important habitat for this life stage. Current marine park zoning appears to provide an effective protection for juveniles within this area. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)371-383
    Number of pages13
    JournalEnvironmental Biology of Fishes
    Volume97
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

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    Western Australia
    reefs
    lagoon
    reef
    site fidelity
    zoning
    marine park
    coastal lagoon
    philopatry
    tourism
    telemetry
    economic valuation
    mangrove
    coral reefs
    coral reef
    acoustics
    water temperature
    fishery
    fisheries
    winter

    Cite this

    Cerutti-Pereyra, F., Thums, M., Austin, C. M., Bradshaw, C. J. A., Stevens, J. D., Babcock, R. C., ... Meekan, M. G. (2014). Restricted movements of juvenile rays in the lagoon of Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia - evidence for the existence of a nursery. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 97(4), 371-383. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10641-013-0158-y
    Cerutti-Pereyra, F. ; Thums, Michele ; Austin, C. M. ; Bradshaw, C. J A ; Stevens, John D ; Babcock, R. C. ; Pillans, Richard D ; Meekan, M. G. / Restricted movements of juvenile rays in the lagoon of Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia - evidence for the existence of a nursery. In: Environmental Biology of Fishes. 2014 ; Vol. 97, No. 4. pp. 371-383.
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    abstract = "Little information is available on the movements and behaviour of tropical rays despite their potential ecological roles and economic value as a fishery and a tourism resource. A description of the movement patterns and site fidelity of juvenile rays within a coral reef environment is provided in this study. Acoustic telemetry was used to focus on the use of potential nursery areas and describe movement patterns of 16 individuals of four species monitored for 1-21 months within an array of 51 listening stations deployed across a lagoon, reef crest, and reef slope at Mangrove Bay, Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia. Juveniles used a small (< 1 km2), shallow (1-2 m depth) embayment where three receivers recorded 60-80 {\%} of total detections of tagged animals, although individuals of all species moved throughout the array and beyond the lagoon to the open reef slope. Detections at these primary sites were more frequent during winter and when water temperatures were highest during the day. Long-term use of coastal lagoons by juvenile rays suggests that they provide an important habitat for this life stage. Current marine park zoning appears to provide an effective protection for juveniles within this area. {\circledC} 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.",
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    Cerutti-Pereyra, F, Thums, M, Austin, CM, Bradshaw, CJA, Stevens, JD, Babcock, RC, Pillans, RD & Meekan, MG 2014, 'Restricted movements of juvenile rays in the lagoon of Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia - evidence for the existence of a nursery', Environmental Biology of Fishes, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 371-383. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10641-013-0158-y

    Restricted movements of juvenile rays in the lagoon of Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia - evidence for the existence of a nursery. / Cerutti-Pereyra, F.; Thums, Michele; Austin, C. M.; Bradshaw, C. J A; Stevens, John D; Babcock, R. C.; Pillans, Richard D; Meekan, M. G.

    In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, Vol. 97, No. 4, 04.2014, p. 371-383.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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