Revisiting Food Reserve Policies and Practices

Recent Observation from Asian Countries

Jonatan Lassa, M Caballero-Anthony, Paul Teng, Maxim Sherstha

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Ensuring stability in terms of availability, access and utilisation of food has long been a central concern for national governments, and more recently global multilateral institutions concerned with food and agriculture. There are many paths to ensure food stability for countries. International food markets and trade have been considered as one of the most efficient ways especially after 1970s. Similarly, pursuing self-sufficiency policies and ensuring the production of all required food within the country has been another strategy of choice. However, neither has proved to be successful or efficient, all of the time, in the past. In the aftermath of the world food (price) crisis in 2007/2008 and 2011 when the international food markets were extremely volatile even in the absence of any major disruptions in world food production, governments have been revisiting one of the oldest strategies to ensure greater stability, that of maintaining food stockpiles. Countries which have adequate food stockpiles can weather global food price shocks, local supply shocks from failed harvests, income shocks (from economic downturns or exchange rate shocks), disruptions in trade due to export bans, as well as during times of emergencies and calamities. This research asks to what extent and how food stockpiling can help stabilise, build resiliency, and allow for a more robust national food security? This paper is based on the findings from the field work in Asia (India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Singapore).
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication60th Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society
    Place of PublicationCanberra, Australia
    PublisherAustralasian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    EventAnnual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (AARES 2016 60th) - Hyatt Hotel, Canberra, Australia
    Duration: 2 Feb 20165 Feb 2016
    Conference number: 2016 (60th)
    http://www.aares.org.au/imis_prod/AARES2016/Events/2016_Annual_Conference/ImportTemp/2016HomePage.aspx?hkey=3de2d9cc-ac85-41ba-9bb3-c7d273b8b6d6

    Conference

    ConferenceAnnual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (AARES 2016 60th)
    Abbreviated titleAARES
    CountryAustralia
    CityCanberra
    Period2/02/165/02/16
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    Asian countries
    Food
    Government
    Food markets
    Disruption
    Food prices
    Agriculture
    Thailand
    Exchange rates
    Supply shocks
    Emergency
    Harvest
    Malaysia
    Indonesia
    Income shocks
    Philippines
    Food security
    Asia
    Resiliency
    Food trade

    Cite this

    Lassa, J., Caballero-Anthony, M., Teng, P., & Sherstha, M. (2016). Revisiting Food Reserve Policies and Practices: Recent Observation from Asian Countries. In 60th Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society Canberra, Australia : Australasian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society.
    Lassa, Jonatan ; Caballero-Anthony, M ; Teng, Paul ; Sherstha, Maxim. / Revisiting Food Reserve Policies and Practices : Recent Observation from Asian Countries. 60th Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society. Canberra, Australia : Australasian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society, 2016.
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    Lassa, J, Caballero-Anthony, M, Teng, P & Sherstha, M 2016, Revisiting Food Reserve Policies and Practices: Recent Observation from Asian Countries. in 60th Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society. Australasian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society, Canberra, Australia , Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (AARES 2016 60th), Canberra, Australia, 2/02/16.

    Revisiting Food Reserve Policies and Practices : Recent Observation from Asian Countries. / Lassa, Jonatan; Caballero-Anthony, M; Teng, Paul; Sherstha, Maxim.

    60th Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society. Canberra, Australia : Australasian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society, 2016.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

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    Lassa J, Caballero-Anthony M, Teng P, Sherstha M. Revisiting Food Reserve Policies and Practices: Recent Observation from Asian Countries. In 60th Annual Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society. Canberra, Australia : Australasian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society. 2016