Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback

monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting

T Snelling, Rosalie Schultz, J Graham, R Roseby, G Barnes, Ross Andrews, Jonathan Carapetis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Indigenous children living in arid Central Australia experience frequent outbreaks of rotavirus gastroenteritis. A widespread outbreak of G9 rotavirus infection occurred several months after introduction of the RIX4414 rotavirus vaccine. We performed a retrospective case-control study to determine vaccine efficacy during the outbreak. Two doses provided an estimated vaccine efficacy of 77.7% (95% confidence interval, 40.2%-91.7%) against hospitalization for gastroenteritis. Vaccine efficacy was 84.5% (95% confidence interval, 23.4%-96.9%) against confirmed cases of rotavirus infection. Vaccination was effective in this high-burden setting. � 2009 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)428-431
    Number of pages4
    JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
    Volume49
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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    Rotavirus
    Disease Outbreaks
    Rotavirus Infections
    Vaccines
    Gastroenteritis
    Confidence Intervals
    Rotavirus Vaccines
    Case-Control Studies
    Vaccination
    Hospitalization

    Cite this

    Snelling, T., Schultz, R., Graham, J., Roseby, R., Barnes, G., Andrews, R., & Carapetis, J. (2009). Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback: monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 49(3), 428-431.
    Snelling, T ; Schultz, Rosalie ; Graham, J ; Roseby, R ; Barnes, G ; Andrews, Ross ; Carapetis, Jonathan. / Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback : monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 428-431.
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    abstract = "Indigenous children living in arid Central Australia experience frequent outbreaks of rotavirus gastroenteritis. A widespread outbreak of G9 rotavirus infection occurred several months after introduction of the RIX4414 rotavirus vaccine. We performed a retrospective case-control study to determine vaccine efficacy during the outbreak. Two doses provided an estimated vaccine efficacy of 77.7{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval, 40.2{\%}-91.7{\%}) against hospitalization for gastroenteritis. Vaccine efficacy was 84.5{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval, 23.4{\%}-96.9{\%}) against confirmed cases of rotavirus infection. Vaccination was effective in this high-burden setting. � 2009 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.",
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    Snelling, T, Schultz, R, Graham, J, Roseby, R, Barnes, G, Andrews, R & Carapetis, J 2009, 'Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback: monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 428-431.

    Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback : monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting. / Snelling, T; Schultz, Rosalie; Graham, J; Roseby, R; Barnes, G; Andrews, Ross; Carapetis, Jonathan.

    In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 49, No. 3, 2009, p. 428-431.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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