Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback: monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting

T Snelling, Rosalie Schultz, J Graham, R Roseby, G Barnes, Ross Andrews, Jonathan Carapetis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Indigenous children living in arid Central Australia experience frequent outbreaks of rotavirus gastroenteritis. A widespread outbreak of G9 rotavirus infection occurred several months after introduction of the RIX4414 rotavirus vaccine. We performed a retrospective case-control study to determine vaccine efficacy during the outbreak. Two doses provided an estimated vaccine efficacy of 77.7% (95% confidence interval, 40.2%-91.7%) against hospitalization for gastroenteritis. Vaccine efficacy was 84.5% (95% confidence interval, 23.4%-96.9%) against confirmed cases of rotavirus infection. Vaccination was effective in this high-burden setting. � 2009 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)428-431
    Number of pages4
    JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
    Volume49
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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    Snelling, T., Schultz, R., Graham, J., Roseby, R., Barnes, G., Andrews, R., & Carapetis, J. (2009). Rotavirus and the indigenous children of the Australian outback: monovalent vaccine effective in a high-burden setting. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 49(3), 428-431.