Safety, equity and monitoring: a review of the gaps in maternal vaccination strategies for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Lisa McHugh, Kristy Crooks, Amy Creighton, Michael Binks, Ross M. Andrews

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Influenza and pertussis infections are disproportionately higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their infants compared to other Australians. These infections are potentially preventable through vaccination in pregnancy; however, there is a lack of systematic monitoring and therefore knowledge of vaccine uptake, safety and effectiveness in Australia, and specifically among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. The limited data available suggest there is a lower uptake of maternal vaccination among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women compared to non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and this review seeks to explore potential reasons and the knowledge gaps in this regard. Other key gaps include the equitable access to quality antenatal care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women; and pregnancy loss <20 weeks gestation. Furthermore, our review highlights the importance of addressing these gaps in maternal vaccination strategies in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)371-376
    Number of pages6
    JournalHuman Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics
    Volume16
    Issue number2
    Early online date6 Sep 2019
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

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