Sea Country Indigenous Protected Areas

growing Australia’s marine protected area estate through Indigenous-led collaborative governance of coastal and marine estates

Margaret Ayre, Gathapurra Munungurr, Luke Playford, Jacqueline Gould, Melanie Dulfer-Hyams

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Research

Abstract

This presentation explores a unique and effective form of collaborative governance for marine and coastal conservation that empowers Indigenous communities, governments, industries and communities alike to work together to achieve social, cultural and ecological sustainability goals. This collaborative governance approach has emerged in the context of the creation of Sea Country Indigenous Protected Areas (SC IPAs) over the past decade in Australia by Indigenous communities exercising their stewardship of marine/coastal areas. In this presentation, we identify the governance attributes of SC IPAs through case studies to show how these align with international ‘good governance’ principles for management of complex socio-cultural-ecological systems. These attributes include: Indigenous leadership and empowerment; a focus on Indigenous law and governance as the basis for collaboration; the flexibility to account for different legal regimes and tenures; the inclusion of other stakeholders in productive partnerships; and, the recognition of ‘sea country’ as the key spatial extent of decision making and management action. We argue that SC IPAs represent an effective form of governance for marine/coastal areas and should be widely recognised by marine policy makers and managers for their contribution to the management of Australia’s marine estate.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018
EventCoast to Coast 2018: Meeting on the Margin - Hobart, Australia
Duration: 16 Apr 201820 Apr 2018

Conference

ConferenceCoast to Coast 2018
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period16/04/1820/04/18

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protected area
governance approach
marine policy
empowerment
leadership
stakeholder
decision making
sustainability
sea
industry
attribute
coastal area

Cite this

Ayre, M., Munungurr, G., Playford, L., Gould, J., & Dulfer-Hyams, M. (2018). Sea Country Indigenous Protected Areas: growing Australia’s marine protected area estate through Indigenous-led collaborative governance of coastal and marine estates. Paper presented at Coast to Coast 2018, Hobart, Australia.
Ayre, Margaret ; Munungurr, Gathapurra ; Playford, Luke ; Gould, Jacqueline ; Dulfer-Hyams, Melanie. / Sea Country Indigenous Protected Areas : growing Australia’s marine protected area estate through Indigenous-led collaborative governance of coastal and marine estates. Paper presented at Coast to Coast 2018, Hobart, Australia.20 p.
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Ayre, M, Munungurr, G, Playford, L, Gould, J & Dulfer-Hyams, M 2018, 'Sea Country Indigenous Protected Areas: growing Australia’s marine protected area estate through Indigenous-led collaborative governance of coastal and marine estates' Paper presented at Coast to Coast 2018, Hobart, Australia, 16/04/18 - 20/04/18, .

Sea Country Indigenous Protected Areas : growing Australia’s marine protected area estate through Indigenous-led collaborative governance of coastal and marine estates. / Ayre, Margaret; Munungurr, Gathapurra; Playford, Luke; Gould, Jacqueline; Dulfer-Hyams, Melanie.

2018. Paper presented at Coast to Coast 2018, Hobart, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Research

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M3 - Conference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)

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