Serological Evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in U.S. Marines Who Trained in Australia From 2012–2014

A Retrospective Analysis of Archived Samples

Kevin L. Schully, Mary Burtnick, Matthew G. Bell, Ammarah Spall, Mark Mayo, Vanessa Rigas, Alyssa A. Chan, Kathleen Yu, Danielle V. Clark, Ryan C. Maves, Bart Currie, Paul Brett, James V. Lawler

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Infection with the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in a life-threatening disease known as melioidosis. Historically, melioidosis was a common infection in military forces serving in Southeast Asia, and it has the potential to have a serious impact on force health readiness. With the U.S. Department of Defense’s increasing strategic and operational focus across the Pacific Theater, melioidosis is an increasingly important issue from a force health protection perspective. U.S. Marines deploy annually to Darwin, Australia, a “hyperendemic” region for B. pseudomallei, to engage in training exercises. In an effort to assess the risk of B. pseudomalleiinfection to service personnel in Australia, 341 paired samples, representing pre- and post-deployment samples of Marines who trained in Australia, were analyzed for antibodies against B. pseudomallei antigens. Serological evidence of possible deployment-related infection with B. pseudomallei was found in 13 Marines. Future prospective studies are required to further characterize the risk to service members deployed to melioidosis endemic areas.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)8-17
    Number of pages10
    JournalMSMR
    Volume26
    Issue number7
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

    Fingerprint

    Burkholderia Infections
    Melioidosis
    Burkholderia pseudomallei
    Military Personnel
    United States Department of Defense
    Infection
    Southeastern Asia
    Health
    Gram-Negative Bacteria
    Prospective Studies
    Exercise
    Antigens
    Antibodies

    Cite this

    Schully, Kevin L. ; Burtnick, Mary ; Bell, Matthew G. ; Spall, Ammarah ; Mayo, Mark ; Rigas, Vanessa ; Chan, Alyssa A. ; Yu, Kathleen ; Clark, Danielle V. ; Maves, Ryan C. ; Currie, Bart ; Brett, Paul ; Lawler, James V. / Serological Evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in U.S. Marines Who Trained in Australia From 2012–2014 : A Retrospective Analysis of Archived Samples. In: MSMR. 2019 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 8-17.
    @article{cb7e81a2592a41efa6d4afaa55fed515,
    title = "Serological Evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in U.S. Marines Who Trained in Australia From 2012–2014: A Retrospective Analysis of Archived Samples",
    abstract = "Infection with the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in a life-threatening disease known as melioidosis. Historically, melioidosis was a common infection in military forces serving in Southeast Asia, and it has the potential to have a serious impact on force health readiness. With the U.S. Department of Defense’s increasing strategic and operational focus across the Pacific Theater, melioidosis is an increasingly important issue from a force health protection perspective. U.S. Marines deploy annually to Darwin, Australia, a “hyperendemic” region for B. pseudomallei, to engage in training exercises. In an effort to assess the risk of B. pseudomalleiinfection to service personnel in Australia, 341 paired samples, representing pre- and post-deployment samples of Marines who trained in Australia, were analyzed for antibodies against B. pseudomallei antigens. Serological evidence of possible deployment-related infection with B. pseudomallei was found in 13 Marines. Future prospective studies are required to further characterize the risk to service members deployed to melioidosis endemic areas.",
    author = "Schully, {Kevin L.} and Mary Burtnick and Bell, {Matthew G.} and Ammarah Spall and Mark Mayo and Vanessa Rigas and Chan, {Alyssa A.} and Kathleen Yu and Clark, {Danielle V.} and Maves, {Ryan C.} and Bart Currie and Paul Brett and Lawler, {James V.}",
    year = "2019",
    month = "7",
    language = "English",
    volume = "26",
    pages = "8--17",
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    Schully, KL, Burtnick, M, Bell, MG, Spall, A, Mayo, M, Rigas, V, Chan, AA, Yu, K, Clark, DV, Maves, RC, Currie, B, Brett, P & Lawler, JV 2019, 'Serological Evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in U.S. Marines Who Trained in Australia From 2012–2014: A Retrospective Analysis of Archived Samples', MSMR, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 8-17.

    Serological Evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in U.S. Marines Who Trained in Australia From 2012–2014 : A Retrospective Analysis of Archived Samples. / Schully, Kevin L.; Burtnick, Mary; Bell, Matthew G.; Spall, Ammarah; Mayo, Mark; Rigas, Vanessa; Chan, Alyssa A.; Yu, Kathleen; Clark, Danielle V.; Maves, Ryan C.; Currie, Bart; Brett, Paul; Lawler, James V.

    In: MSMR, Vol. 26, No. 7, 07.2019, p. 8-17.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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