Sex Reassignment Surgery – Panacea, Placebo or Pandora’s Box? A Narrative Inquiry

Belinda Chaplin

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)

Abstract

According to the DSM, Gender Identity Disorder (GID) is a medical condition where an individual strongly and persistently identifies with the opposite gender. One recognised treatment for some individuals diagnosed with the disorder is sex reassignment surgery (SRS). SRS has been performed in many countries, including Australia for many decades. Although SRS generally has normative effects for those that undergo the procedure and life satisfaction improves as a result of the irreversible operation, SRS is but one option for the gender dysphoric individual. This paper will report on some of the possible physical and psychosocial impacts of SRS on the individual based upon the stories of three male to female (MTF) post-operative trans* people.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventQueensland Transgender, Sistergirl and Gender Diverse Conference - Cairns, Australia
Duration: 24 Aug 201225 Aug 2012

Conference

ConferenceQueensland Transgender, Sistergirl and Gender Diverse Conference
CountryAustralia
CityCairns
Period24/08/1225/08/12

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    Chaplin, B. (2011). Sex Reassignment Surgery – Panacea, Placebo or Pandora’s Box? A Narrative Inquiry. Paper presented at Queensland Transgender, Sistergirl and Gender Diverse Conference, Cairns, Australia.