So you want to conduct a randomised trial? Learnings from a ‘failed’ feasibility study of a Crisis Resource Management prompt during simulated paediatric resuscitation

Rachel Teis, Jyai Allen, Nigel Lee, Sue Kildea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: No study has tested a Crisis Resource Management prompt on resuscitation performance.

Methods: We conducted a feasibility, unblinded, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial at one Australian paediatric hospital (June–September 2014). Eligible participants were any doctor, nurse, or nurse manager who would normally be involved in a Medical Emergency Team simulation. The unit of block randomisation was one of six scenarios (3 control:3 intervention) with or without a verbal prompt. The primary outcomes tested the feasibility and utility of the intervention and data collection tools. The secondary outcomes measured resuscitation quality and team performance.

Results: Data were analysed from six resuscitation scenarios (n = 49 participants); three control groups (n = 25) and three intervention groups (n = 24). The ability to measure all data items on the data collection tools was hindered by problems with the recording devices both in the mannequins and the video camera.

Conclusions: For a pilot study, greater training for the prompt role and pre-briefing participants about assessment of their cardio-pulmonary resuscitation quality should be undertaken. Data could be analysed in real time with independent video analysis to validate findings. Two cameras would strengthen reliability of the methods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-44
Number of pages8
JournalAustralasian Emergency Nursing Journal
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

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