Somewhat saved

a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild

Paul Andrew, Hal Cogger, Don Driscoll, Samantha Flakus, Peter Harlow, Dion Maple, Mike Misso, Caitlin Pink, Kent Retallick, Karrie Anne Rose, Brendan Tiernan, Judy West, John Casimir Woinarski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    As with many islands, Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean has suffered severe biodiversity loss. Its terrestrial lizard fauna comprised five native species, of which four were endemic. These were abundant until at least the late 1970s, but four species declined rapidly thereafter and were last reported in the wild between 2009 and 2013. In response to the decline, a captive breeding programme was established in August 2009. This attempt came too late for the Christmas Island forest skink Emoia nativitatis, whose last known individual died in captivity in 2014, and for the non-endemic coastal skink Emoia atrocostata. However, two captive populations are now established for Lister's gecko Lepidodactylus listeri and the blue-tailed skink Cryptoblepharus egeriae. The conservation future for these two species is challenging: reintroduction will not be possible until the main threats are identified and controlled.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)171-174
    Number of pages4
    JournalOryx
    Volume52
    Issue number1
    Early online date30 Nov 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

    Fingerprint

    Territory of Christmas Island
    captive breeding
    Scincidae
    lizard
    lizards
    breeding
    captive population
    Gekkonidae
    captivity
    reintroduction
    Indian Ocean
    native species
    indigenous species
    fauna
    biodiversity
    extinct species
    programme

    Cite this

    Andrew, Paul ; Cogger, Hal ; Driscoll, Don ; Flakus, Samantha ; Harlow, Peter ; Maple, Dion ; Misso, Mike ; Pink, Caitlin ; Retallick, Kent ; Rose, Karrie Anne ; Tiernan, Brendan ; West, Judy ; Woinarski, John Casimir. / Somewhat saved : a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild. In: Oryx. 2018 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 171-174.
    @article{5d210b18d4f7462f95b3217faa9baa72,
    title = "Somewhat saved: a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild",
    abstract = "As with many islands, Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean has suffered severe biodiversity loss. Its terrestrial lizard fauna comprised five native species, of which four were endemic. These were abundant until at least the late 1970s, but four species declined rapidly thereafter and were last reported in the wild between 2009 and 2013. In response to the decline, a captive breeding programme was established in August 2009. This attempt came too late for the Christmas Island forest skink Emoia nativitatis, whose last known individual died in captivity in 2014, and for the non-endemic coastal skink Emoia atrocostata. However, two captive populations are now established for Lister's gecko Lepidodactylus listeri and the blue-tailed skink Cryptoblepharus egeriae. The conservation future for these two species is challenging: reintroduction will not be possible until the main threats are identified and controlled.",
    keywords = "Christmas Island, extinction, gecko, Indian Ocean, reintroduction, skink",
    author = "Paul Andrew and Hal Cogger and Don Driscoll and Samantha Flakus and Peter Harlow and Dion Maple and Mike Misso and Caitlin Pink and Kent Retallick and Rose, {Karrie Anne} and Brendan Tiernan and Judy West and Woinarski, {John Casimir}",
    year = "2018",
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    doi = "10.1017/S0030605316001071",
    language = "English",
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    Andrew, P, Cogger, H, Driscoll, D, Flakus, S, Harlow, P, Maple, D, Misso, M, Pink, C, Retallick, K, Rose, KA, Tiernan, B, West, J & Woinarski, JC 2018, 'Somewhat saved: a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild', Oryx, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 171-174. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0030605316001071

    Somewhat saved : a captive breeding programme for two endemic Christmas Island lizard species, now extinct in the wild. / Andrew, Paul; Cogger, Hal; Driscoll, Don; Flakus, Samantha; Harlow, Peter; Maple, Dion; Misso, Mike; Pink, Caitlin; Retallick, Kent; Rose, Karrie Anne; Tiernan, Brendan; West, Judy; Woinarski, John Casimir.

    In: Oryx, Vol. 52, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 171-174.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Harlow, Peter

    AU - Maple, Dion

    AU - Misso, Mike

    AU - Pink, Caitlin

    AU - Retallick, Kent

    AU - Rose, Karrie Anne

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