Spatial Metaphors of the Number Line

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in Proceedings

    Abstract

    This paper examines spatial metaphors in the English language associated with the number line, in particular metaphors of direction and motion, and how these are manifested in actual spatial practices associated with number. It considers how these metaphors are culturally influenced, and how the influences of other cultures, such as Arabic, produce inconsistencies that can contribute to confusion in the classroom. It also considers how the metaphors of number vary in some other languages, and how this leads to both different spatial representations of numbers and more challenges in multilingual and multicultural classrooms. In particular, it pays attention to the implications of variety in these metaphors for the mathematics education of Indigenous students in Australia being taught by English speaking teachers.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
    EditorsJaguthsing Dindyal, Lu Pien Cheng, Swee Fong Ng
    Place of PublicationSingapore
    PublisherMathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
    Pages250-257
    Number of pages8
    ISBN (Print)978-981-07-2527-3
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Event2012 Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia - Singapore
    Duration: 2 Jul 20126 Jul 2012

    Conference

    Conference2012 Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
    Period2/07/126/07/12

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  • Cite this

    Edmonds-Wathen, C. (2012). Spatial Metaphors of the Number Line. In J. Dindyal, L. P. Cheng, & S. F. Ng (Eds.), Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (pp. 250-257). Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia.