Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

John Condon, T Barnes, B Armstrong, S Selva-nayagam, J Elwood

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: To investigate whether Indigenous Australians with cancer have more advanced disease at diagnosis than other Australians, and whether late diagnosis explains lower Indigenous cancer survival rates. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: Indigenous and non-Indigenous people diagnosed with cancers of the colon and rectum, lung, breast or cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Northern Territory of Australia in 1991-2000. Main outcome measures: SEER summary stage of cancer at diagnosis (local, regional or distant spread), cause-specific cancer survival rates and relative risk of cancer death. Results: Diagnosis with advanced disease (regional or distant spread) was more common for Indigenous people (70%; 95% CI, 62%-78%) than for non-Indigenous people (51%; 95% CI, 53%-59%) with cancers of the colon and rectum, breast, cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but for lung cancer the opposite was found (Indigenous, 56% [95% CI, 46%-65%] v non-Indigenous, 69% [95% CI, 64%-75%]). Stage-adjusted survival rates were lower for Indigenous people for each cancer site. With few exceptions, the relative risk of cancer death was higher for Indigenous people for each category of stage at diagnosis for each cancer site. Conclusions: Health services apparently could, and should, be performing better for Indigenous people with cancer in the Northern Territory, and probably elsewhere in Australia. This study has demonstrated that data from cancer registers, enhanced with data on stage at diagnosis, can be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory; similar data is available in other States, and could be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous people throughout Australia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)277-280
    Number of pages4
    JournalMedical Journal of Australia
    Volume182
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Northern Territory
    Neoplasms
    Indigenous Health Services
    Rectal Neoplasms
    Cervix Uteri
    Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Colonic Neoplasms
    Breast
    Delayed Diagnosis
    Health Services
    Lung Neoplasms
    Cohort Studies
    Retrospective Studies
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    Cite this

    Condon, J., Barnes, T., Armstrong, B., Selva-nayagam, S., & Elwood, J. (2005). Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. Medical Journal of Australia, 182(6), 277-280.
    Condon, John ; Barnes, T ; Armstrong, B ; Selva-nayagam, S ; Elwood, J. / Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2005 ; Vol. 182, No. 6. pp. 277-280.
    @article{c59e1b8646d44d78bf19d27e4acdcf4e,
    title = "Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory",
    abstract = "Objective: To investigate whether Indigenous Australians with cancer have more advanced disease at diagnosis than other Australians, and whether late diagnosis explains lower Indigenous cancer survival rates. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: Indigenous and non-Indigenous people diagnosed with cancers of the colon and rectum, lung, breast or cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Northern Territory of Australia in 1991-2000. Main outcome measures: SEER summary stage of cancer at diagnosis (local, regional or distant spread), cause-specific cancer survival rates and relative risk of cancer death. Results: Diagnosis with advanced disease (regional or distant spread) was more common for Indigenous people (70{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 62{\%}-78{\%}) than for non-Indigenous people (51{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 53{\%}-59{\%}) with cancers of the colon and rectum, breast, cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but for lung cancer the opposite was found (Indigenous, 56{\%} [95{\%} CI, 46{\%}-65{\%}] v non-Indigenous, 69{\%} [95{\%} CI, 64{\%}-75{\%}]). Stage-adjusted survival rates were lower for Indigenous people for each cancer site. With few exceptions, the relative risk of cancer death was higher for Indigenous people for each category of stage at diagnosis for each cancer site. Conclusions: Health services apparently could, and should, be performing better for Indigenous people with cancer in the Northern Territory, and probably elsewhere in Australia. This study has demonstrated that data from cancer registers, enhanced with data on stage at diagnosis, can be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory; similar data is available in other States, and could be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous people throughout Australia.",
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    author = "John Condon and T Barnes and B Armstrong and S Selva-nayagam and J Elwood",
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    Condon, J, Barnes, T, Armstrong, B, Selva-nayagam, S & Elwood, J 2005, 'Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory', Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 182, no. 6, pp. 277-280.

    Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory. / Condon, John; Barnes, T; Armstrong, B; Selva-nayagam, S; Elwood, J.

    In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 182, No. 6, 2005, p. 277-280.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Stage at diagnosis and cancer survival for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

    AU - Condon, John

    AU - Barnes, T

    AU - Armstrong, B

    AU - Selva-nayagam, S

    AU - Elwood, J

    PY - 2005

    Y1 - 2005

    N2 - Objective: To investigate whether Indigenous Australians with cancer have more advanced disease at diagnosis than other Australians, and whether late diagnosis explains lower Indigenous cancer survival rates. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: Indigenous and non-Indigenous people diagnosed with cancers of the colon and rectum, lung, breast or cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Northern Territory of Australia in 1991-2000. Main outcome measures: SEER summary stage of cancer at diagnosis (local, regional or distant spread), cause-specific cancer survival rates and relative risk of cancer death. Results: Diagnosis with advanced disease (regional or distant spread) was more common for Indigenous people (70%; 95% CI, 62%-78%) than for non-Indigenous people (51%; 95% CI, 53%-59%) with cancers of the colon and rectum, breast, cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but for lung cancer the opposite was found (Indigenous, 56% [95% CI, 46%-65%] v non-Indigenous, 69% [95% CI, 64%-75%]). Stage-adjusted survival rates were lower for Indigenous people for each cancer site. With few exceptions, the relative risk of cancer death was higher for Indigenous people for each category of stage at diagnosis for each cancer site. Conclusions: Health services apparently could, and should, be performing better for Indigenous people with cancer in the Northern Territory, and probably elsewhere in Australia. This study has demonstrated that data from cancer registers, enhanced with data on stage at diagnosis, can be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory; similar data is available in other States, and could be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous people throughout Australia.

    AB - Objective: To investigate whether Indigenous Australians with cancer have more advanced disease at diagnosis than other Australians, and whether late diagnosis explains lower Indigenous cancer survival rates. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants: Indigenous and non-Indigenous people diagnosed with cancers of the colon and rectum, lung, breast or cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Northern Territory of Australia in 1991-2000. Main outcome measures: SEER summary stage of cancer at diagnosis (local, regional or distant spread), cause-specific cancer survival rates and relative risk of cancer death. Results: Diagnosis with advanced disease (regional or distant spread) was more common for Indigenous people (70%; 95% CI, 62%-78%) than for non-Indigenous people (51%; 95% CI, 53%-59%) with cancers of the colon and rectum, breast, cervix and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but for lung cancer the opposite was found (Indigenous, 56% [95% CI, 46%-65%] v non-Indigenous, 69% [95% CI, 64%-75%]). Stage-adjusted survival rates were lower for Indigenous people for each cancer site. With few exceptions, the relative risk of cancer death was higher for Indigenous people for each category of stage at diagnosis for each cancer site. Conclusions: Health services apparently could, and should, be performing better for Indigenous people with cancer in the Northern Territory, and probably elsewhere in Australia. This study has demonstrated that data from cancer registers, enhanced with data on stage at diagnosis, can be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory; similar data is available in other States, and could be used to monitor health service performance for Indigenous people throughout Australia.

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    KW - controlled study

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    KW - metastasis

    KW - nonhodgkin lymphoma

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    KW - Breast Neoplasms

    KW - Colorectal Neoplasms

    KW - Female

    KW - Humans

    KW - Lung Neoplasms

    KW - Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin

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    KW - Survival Analysis

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    EP - 280

    JO - Medical Journal of Australia

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