Stories, stones, and memories in the land of dormant reciprocity. Opening up possibilities for reconciliation with a politics that works tensions of dissensus and consensus with care

Britt Kramvig, Helen Verran

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    In this article we address storytelling as an epistemic practice and ask if/how
    storytelling can become a tool for reconciliation, specifically in relation to violent acts of past and present colonising. In Sápmi, telling stories is essential
    in everyday life. Stories are told to engage actively with questions, as opposed to referring to an absent past, or to bringing forth explanations or arguments. Stories are told to bring past events and knowledge on how to live well and respectfully with both human and non-human beings into the present knowledge. Enacting in stories is also a central part of recalling how earthlings can live together in the Sámi landscape. In this article, stories on sieidies (Sámi sacrificial place) are addressed. We make evident the existence of a land of dormant reciprocity in the Norwegian present, and establish sieidies as ontologically multiple. We will propose that stories, with their implicit or explicit recognition of this multiplicity, can work in the ongoing reconciliation addressed by the Norwegian government and the Sámi Parliament.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationRecognition, Reconciliation and Restoration
    Subtitle of host publicationApplying a Decolonized Understanding in Social Work and Healing Processes
    EditorsJan Erik Henriksen, Ida Hydle, Britt Kramvig
    Place of PublicationStamsund, Norway
    PublisherOrkana Akademisk
    Chapter19
    Pages163-180
    Number of pages17
    Edition1
    ISBN (Electronic)978-82-8104-411-1, 978-82-8104-412-8, 978-82-8104-413-5, 978-82-8104-414-2
    ISBN (Print)978-82-8104-392-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

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