Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship

Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership

Kathryn Moyle

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)36-51
    Number of pages16
    JournalEducation Sciences
    Volume4
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 9 Jan 2014

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    Democracy
    citizenship
    leadership
    democracy
    Technology
    school
    Teaching
    Learning
    learning
    Values
    classroom
    school policy
    school education
    Education
    principal
    leader
    curriculum
    Curriculum
    Lenses
    teacher

    Cite this

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    abstract = "There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership.",
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    Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship : Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership. / Moyle, Kathryn.

    In: Education Sciences, Vol. 4, No. 1, 09.01.2014, p. 36-51.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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