Ten years on from the World Health Organization Commission of Social Determinants of Health

Progress or procrastination?

James Smith, Kalinda Griffiths, Jenni Judd, Gemma Crawford, Heather D'Antoine, Matthew Fisher, Roxanne Bainbridge, Patrick Harris

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Ten years have passed since the release of the final report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH), a landmark document that provided a global blue-print for the health promotion community and the stakeholders we work with. Three overarching recommendations were outlined, improving daily living conditions; tackling the inequi-table distribution of power, money and resources; and measuring and understanding the problem and assessing the impact of action. The extent to which progress has been, and continues to be, made is contested. This editorial briefly reflects on what has been achieved over the past decade—in broad terms—about action on the social determinants of health (SDH) in Australia. We deliberately take a balanced view by highlighting the weaknesses and strengths in what has been achieved by governments, non-government organisations, research institutions, peak bodies and civil society. We also reflect on the ongoing role that the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA) has played in advancing our understanding about, and action on, the SDH
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-7
    Number of pages5
    JournalHealth Promotion Journal of Australia
    Volume29
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2018

    Fingerprint

    Social Determinants of Health
    Health Promotion
    Social Conditions
    Organizations
    Research

    Cite this

    Smith, James ; Griffiths, Kalinda ; Judd, Jenni ; Crawford, Gemma ; D'Antoine, Heather ; Fisher, Matthew ; Bainbridge, Roxanne ; Harris, Patrick. / Ten years on from the World Health Organization Commission of Social Determinants of Health : Progress or procrastination?. In: Health Promotion Journal of Australia. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 3-7.
    @article{b8ce5ed7fa5a4348b3558c0d802ad5bd,
    title = "Ten years on from the World Health Organization Commission of Social Determinants of Health: Progress or procrastination?",
    abstract = "Ten years have passed since the release of the final report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH), a landmark document that provided a global blue-print for the health promotion community and the stakeholders we work with. Three overarching recommendations were outlined, improving daily living conditions; tackling the inequi-table distribution of power, money and resources; and measuring and understanding the problem and assessing the impact of action. The extent to which progress has been, and continues to be, made is contested. This editorial briefly reflects on what has been achieved over the past decade—in broad terms—about action on the social determinants of health (SDH) in Australia. We deliberately take a balanced view by highlighting the weaknesses and strengths in what has been achieved by governments, non-government organisations, research institutions, peak bodies and civil society. We also reflect on the ongoing role that the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA) has played in advancing our understanding about, and action on, the SDH",
    author = "James Smith and Kalinda Griffiths and Jenni Judd and Gemma Crawford and Heather D'Antoine and Matthew Fisher and Roxanne Bainbridge and Patrick Harris",
    year = "2018",
    month = "4",
    day = "26",
    doi = "10.1002/hpja.48",
    language = "English",
    volume = "29",
    pages = "3--7",
    journal = "Health Promotion Journal of Australia",
    issn = "1036-1073",
    publisher = "Australian Health Promotion Association",
    number = "1",

    }

    Ten years on from the World Health Organization Commission of Social Determinants of Health : Progress or procrastination? / Smith, James; Griffiths, Kalinda; Judd, Jenni; Crawford, Gemma; D'Antoine, Heather; Fisher, Matthew; Bainbridge, Roxanne; Harris, Patrick.

    In: Health Promotion Journal of Australia, Vol. 29, No. 1, 26.04.2018, p. 3-7.

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Ten years on from the World Health Organization Commission of Social Determinants of Health

    T2 - Progress or procrastination?

    AU - Smith, James

    AU - Griffiths, Kalinda

    AU - Judd, Jenni

    AU - Crawford, Gemma

    AU - D'Antoine, Heather

    AU - Fisher, Matthew

    AU - Bainbridge, Roxanne

    AU - Harris, Patrick

    PY - 2018/4/26

    Y1 - 2018/4/26

    N2 - Ten years have passed since the release of the final report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH), a landmark document that provided a global blue-print for the health promotion community and the stakeholders we work with. Three overarching recommendations were outlined, improving daily living conditions; tackling the inequi-table distribution of power, money and resources; and measuring and understanding the problem and assessing the impact of action. The extent to which progress has been, and continues to be, made is contested. This editorial briefly reflects on what has been achieved over the past decade—in broad terms—about action on the social determinants of health (SDH) in Australia. We deliberately take a balanced view by highlighting the weaknesses and strengths in what has been achieved by governments, non-government organisations, research institutions, peak bodies and civil society. We also reflect on the ongoing role that the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA) has played in advancing our understanding about, and action on, the SDH

    AB - Ten years have passed since the release of the final report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH), a landmark document that provided a global blue-print for the health promotion community and the stakeholders we work with. Three overarching recommendations were outlined, improving daily living conditions; tackling the inequi-table distribution of power, money and resources; and measuring and understanding the problem and assessing the impact of action. The extent to which progress has been, and continues to be, made is contested. This editorial briefly reflects on what has been achieved over the past decade—in broad terms—about action on the social determinants of health (SDH) in Australia. We deliberately take a balanced view by highlighting the weaknesses and strengths in what has been achieved by governments, non-government organisations, research institutions, peak bodies and civil society. We also reflect on the ongoing role that the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA) has played in advancing our understanding about, and action on, the SDH

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045983787&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1002/hpja.48

    DO - 10.1002/hpja.48

    M3 - Editorial

    VL - 29

    SP - 3

    EP - 7

    JO - Health Promotion Journal of Australia

    JF - Health Promotion Journal of Australia

    SN - 1036-1073

    IS - 1

    ER -