The ACL Anthology reference corpus: A reference dataset for bibliographic research in computational linguistics

Steven Bird, Robert Dale, Bonnie J. Dorr, Bryan Gibson, Mark T. Joseph, Min Yen Kan, Dongwon Lee, Brett Powley, Dragomir R. Radev, Yee Fan Tan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in Proceedingspeer-review

Abstract

The ACL Anthology is a digital archive of conference and journal papers in natural language processing and computational linguistics. Its primary purpose is to serve as a reference repository of research results, but we believe that it can also be an object of study and a platform for research in its own right. We describe an enriched and standardized reference corpus derived from the ACL Anthology that can be used for research in scholarly document processing. This corpus, which we call the ACL Anthology Reference Corpus (ACL ARC), brings together the recent activities of a number of research groups around the world. Our goal is to make the corpus widely available, and to encourage other researchers to use it as a standard testbed for experiments in both bibliographic and bibliometric research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 6th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, LREC 2008
PublisherEuropean Language Resources Association (ELRA)
Pages1755-1759
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)2951740840, 9782951740846
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event6th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, LREC 2008 - Marrakech, Morocco
Duration: 28 May 200830 May 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 6th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, LREC 2008

Conference

Conference6th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, LREC 2008
CountryMorocco
CityMarrakech
Period28/05/0830/05/08

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