The changing balances of equity, control and market choice in the Indigenous vocational education and training sector

Donald Zoellner, Anne Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The rationales and related programs for delivering vocational education and training to Indigenous Australians have seen significant change over the past 40 years, with several influential reviews marking policy pivot points along the way. Commencing with the 1960s Martin Review, the implementation by governments of selected recommendations have led to structural reforms and the creation of public policy instruments to monitor, regulate and control access to vocational training. These activities have heavily impacted Australian Indigenous people for whom certificate level qualifications are disproportionally the highest level of post-school education held. In the ‘thin’ markets of regional Australia, in particular, the authors of this paper argue that the changing priorities in training policy have systematically perpetuated inequity of access to, and benefit from vocational education and training, contrary to the original conception of a national post-secondary technical and further education system for Australia. Marketisation of the training sector and the transfer of funding responsibility from the public purse to the individual student/worker have produced low rates of employment and high training attrition rates for Indigenous people. We argue that this arises from a fundamental shift in the meaning of equity itself which morphed from being considered a social good into an economic calculation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-20
Number of pages17
JournalLearning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social contexts
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The changing balances of equity, control and market choice in the Indigenous vocational education and training sector'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this