The effects of phonological and morphological training on speech perception scores and grammatical judgments in deaf and hard-of-hearing children

Catherine P. Bow, Peter J. Blamey, Louise E. Paatsch, Julia Z. Sarant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Seventeen primary school deaf and hard-of-hearing children were given two types of training for 9 weeks each. Phonological training involved practice of /s, z, t, d/ in word final position in monomorphemic words. Morphological training involved learning and practicing the rules for forming third-person singular, present tense, past tense, and plurals. The words used in the two training types were different (monomorphemic or polymorphemic) but both involved word final /s, z, t, d/. Grammatical judgments were tested before and after training using short sentences that were read aloud by the child (or by the presenter if the child was unable to read them). Perception was tested with 150 key words in sentences using the trained morphemes and phonemes in word final position. Grammatical judgments for sentences involving the trained morphemes improved significantly after each type of training. Both types of training needed to be completed before a significant improvement was found for speech perception scores. The results suggest that both phonological and morphological training are beneficial in improving speech perception and grammatical performance of deaf and hard-of-hearing children and that both types of training were required to obtain the maximum benefit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-314
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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