The impact of school-day variation in weight and height on National Child Measurement Programme body mass index-determined weight category in Year 6 children

A. C. Routen, M. G. Edwards, D. Upton, D. M. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: In England, the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) annually measures the weight and height of Year 6 schoolchildren (age 10-11 years). While measurement protocols are defined, the time of measurement within the school day is not. This study examined the impact of school-day variation in weight and height on NCMP body mass index (BMI)-determined weight category in Year 6 children.

Methods: Standing height and weight were measured in morning and afternoon sessions in 74 children, boys (n= 34; height: 141.16 ± 7.45cm; weight: 36.48 ± 9.46kg, BMI: 18.19 ± 3.98kg/m2) and girls (n= 40; height: 144.58 ± 7.66cm; weight: 42.25 ± 11.29kg; BMI: 19.97 ± 3.98kg/m2) aged 11 ± 0.3 years.

Results: In the whole sample, height decreased (Mean =-0.51cm, 95% CI: -0.39 to -0.64cm, P= 0.01), weight did not change (Mdn = 36.40 to 36.35, P= 0.09) and BMI increased (Mdn = 18.04 to 18.13, P= 0.01). In girls weight increased (Mdn = 41.40 to 41.60, P= 0.01). BMI percentile increased (Mdn = 57th to 59.5th centile, P= 0.01). One girl increased in BMI category from morning to afternoon according to the clinical cut-offs (≤2nd, >91st and >98th) and three girls increased BMI category according to the population monitoring cut-offs (≤2nd, ≥85th, ≥95th).

Conclusions: School-day variation in height (and in girls alone, weight) impact upon increased BMI and BMI percentile in afternoon versus morning measurements in Year 6 children. Although not reaching statistical significance, resultant variation in categorization at the individual level may lead to unwarranted follow-up procedures being initiated. Further research with larger samples is required to further explore the impact of daily variability in height and weight upon both clinical and population monitoring BMI-determined weight status categorization in the NCMP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-367
Number of pages8
JournalChild: Care, Health and Development
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
England
Population
Research

Cite this

@article{377eff37317742839578ba6bed8bbb42,
title = "The impact of school-day variation in weight and height on National Child Measurement Programme body mass index-determined weight category in Year 6 children",
abstract = "Background: In England, the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) annually measures the weight and height of Year 6 schoolchildren (age 10-11 years). While measurement protocols are defined, the time of measurement within the school day is not. This study examined the impact of school-day variation in weight and height on NCMP body mass index (BMI)-determined weight category in Year 6 children. Methods: Standing height and weight were measured in morning and afternoon sessions in 74 children, boys (n= 34; height: 141.16 ± 7.45cm; weight: 36.48 ± 9.46kg, BMI: 18.19 ± 3.98kg/m2) and girls (n= 40; height: 144.58 ± 7.66cm; weight: 42.25 ± 11.29kg; BMI: 19.97 ± 3.98kg/m2) aged 11 ± 0.3 years. Results: In the whole sample, height decreased (Mean =-0.51cm, 95{\%} CI: -0.39 to -0.64cm, P= 0.01), weight did not change (Mdn = 36.40 to 36.35, P= 0.09) and BMI increased (Mdn = 18.04 to 18.13, P= 0.01). In girls weight increased (Mdn = 41.40 to 41.60, P= 0.01). BMI percentile increased (Mdn = 57th to 59.5th centile, P= 0.01). One girl increased in BMI category from morning to afternoon according to the clinical cut-offs (≤2nd, >91st and >98th) and three girls increased BMI category according to the population monitoring cut-offs (≤2nd, ≥85th, ≥95th). Conclusions: School-day variation in height (and in girls alone, weight) impact upon increased BMI and BMI percentile in afternoon versus morning measurements in Year 6 children. Although not reaching statistical significance, resultant variation in categorization at the individual level may lead to unwarranted follow-up procedures being initiated. Further research with larger samples is required to further explore the impact of daily variability in height and weight upon both clinical and population monitoring BMI-determined weight status categorization in the NCMP.",
keywords = "Anthropometry, Diurnal variation, Measurement reliability, Obesity, Overweight",
author = "Routen, {A. C.} and Edwards, {M. G.} and D. Upton and Peters, {D. M.}",
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The impact of school-day variation in weight and height on National Child Measurement Programme body mass index-determined weight category in Year 6 children. / Routen, A. C.; Edwards, M. G.; Upton, D.; Peters, D. M.

In: Child: Care, Health and Development, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 360-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of school-day variation in weight and height on National Child Measurement Programme body mass index-determined weight category in Year 6 children

AU - Routen, A. C.

AU - Edwards, M. G.

AU - Upton, D.

AU - Peters, D. M.

PY - 2011/5/1

Y1 - 2011/5/1

N2 - Background: In England, the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) annually measures the weight and height of Year 6 schoolchildren (age 10-11 years). While measurement protocols are defined, the time of measurement within the school day is not. This study examined the impact of school-day variation in weight and height on NCMP body mass index (BMI)-determined weight category in Year 6 children. Methods: Standing height and weight were measured in morning and afternoon sessions in 74 children, boys (n= 34; height: 141.16 ± 7.45cm; weight: 36.48 ± 9.46kg, BMI: 18.19 ± 3.98kg/m2) and girls (n= 40; height: 144.58 ± 7.66cm; weight: 42.25 ± 11.29kg; BMI: 19.97 ± 3.98kg/m2) aged 11 ± 0.3 years. Results: In the whole sample, height decreased (Mean =-0.51cm, 95% CI: -0.39 to -0.64cm, P= 0.01), weight did not change (Mdn = 36.40 to 36.35, P= 0.09) and BMI increased (Mdn = 18.04 to 18.13, P= 0.01). In girls weight increased (Mdn = 41.40 to 41.60, P= 0.01). BMI percentile increased (Mdn = 57th to 59.5th centile, P= 0.01). One girl increased in BMI category from morning to afternoon according to the clinical cut-offs (≤2nd, >91st and >98th) and three girls increased BMI category according to the population monitoring cut-offs (≤2nd, ≥85th, ≥95th). Conclusions: School-day variation in height (and in girls alone, weight) impact upon increased BMI and BMI percentile in afternoon versus morning measurements in Year 6 children. Although not reaching statistical significance, resultant variation in categorization at the individual level may lead to unwarranted follow-up procedures being initiated. Further research with larger samples is required to further explore the impact of daily variability in height and weight upon both clinical and population monitoring BMI-determined weight status categorization in the NCMP.

AB - Background: In England, the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) annually measures the weight and height of Year 6 schoolchildren (age 10-11 years). While measurement protocols are defined, the time of measurement within the school day is not. This study examined the impact of school-day variation in weight and height on NCMP body mass index (BMI)-determined weight category in Year 6 children. Methods: Standing height and weight were measured in morning and afternoon sessions in 74 children, boys (n= 34; height: 141.16 ± 7.45cm; weight: 36.48 ± 9.46kg, BMI: 18.19 ± 3.98kg/m2) and girls (n= 40; height: 144.58 ± 7.66cm; weight: 42.25 ± 11.29kg; BMI: 19.97 ± 3.98kg/m2) aged 11 ± 0.3 years. Results: In the whole sample, height decreased (Mean =-0.51cm, 95% CI: -0.39 to -0.64cm, P= 0.01), weight did not change (Mdn = 36.40 to 36.35, P= 0.09) and BMI increased (Mdn = 18.04 to 18.13, P= 0.01). In girls weight increased (Mdn = 41.40 to 41.60, P= 0.01). BMI percentile increased (Mdn = 57th to 59.5th centile, P= 0.01). One girl increased in BMI category from morning to afternoon according to the clinical cut-offs (≤2nd, >91st and >98th) and three girls increased BMI category according to the population monitoring cut-offs (≤2nd, ≥85th, ≥95th). Conclusions: School-day variation in height (and in girls alone, weight) impact upon increased BMI and BMI percentile in afternoon versus morning measurements in Year 6 children. Although not reaching statistical significance, resultant variation in categorization at the individual level may lead to unwarranted follow-up procedures being initiated. Further research with larger samples is required to further explore the impact of daily variability in height and weight upon both clinical and population monitoring BMI-determined weight status categorization in the NCMP.

KW - Anthropometry

KW - Diurnal variation

KW - Measurement reliability

KW - Obesity

KW - Overweight

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DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2214.2010.01204.x

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JO - Child: Care, Health and Development

JF - Child: Care, Health and Development

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