The making of Monstrous Breaches

An ethical global visual narrative

Judith Lovell, Kathleen Wallace

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Abstract

Kathleen Wallace is an Eastern Arrernte custodian and artist with a 45-plus year career as a cultural expert and teacher. Her paintings are widely collected and when considered as one extensive body of work represent her homelands and the relationships of Eastern Arrernte to the sociocultural traditions and systems within those homelands. Judy Lovell has been a collaborator with Wallace for 15 years; she is an Anglo-Australian academic and artist with
a background in arts therapy and research. Judy’s interest in Bajan and Caribbean folklore stems from the links in her ancestry to African and British descendants from Barbados.
Describing the making of Monstrous Breaches here gives us an opportunity to reveal some of the elements at work when our artistry, narrative and research occur in intercultural contexts that depend on our adoption of ethical processes as artist researchers who are communicating from very different cultures and heritages. Though they are so often left unspoken and remain unseen, it is important to uncover and explore these processes that underpin the concept of
our ethic in this applied research and artistry – if we wish to engage well at this interface of cultures and styles and traditions with the wider global intercultural imagination.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-124
Number of pages9
JournalLearning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social contexts
Volume2018
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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The making of Monstrous Breaches : An ethical global visual narrative. / Lovell, Judith; Wallace, Kathleen.

In: Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social contexts, Vol. 2018, No. 23, 01.11.2018, p. 116-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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