The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland

Kana Koichi, K. Sangha, Alison Cottrell, Iain J. Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Across Australia, the feral pig (Sus scrofa) is commonly believed to be a serious environmental and agricultural pest. However, the animal may hold socio-economic and cultural values as a source of food and customary activities, such as hunting in some Aboriginal communities. Such positive values mean that pigs are a resource and that conventional management aimed at controlling or extirpating pigs may require further examination. This paper proposes alternative management strategies based on Altman’s hybrid economy model, which incorporates the customary sector of the Aboriginal economy and considers pig hunting to be an important economic activity as well as a control option. We suggest that collaborative management of pigs with a focus on both environmental and rural development has the potential to deliver acceptable outcomes for Aboriginal people and policy makers.

The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282975044_The_Management_Implications_of_Aboriginal_Perceptions_of_Feral_Pigs_Sus_scrofa_in_Northern_Queensland [accessed Dec 01 2017].
Original languageUndefined
Pages (from-to)53-72
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Australian Indigenous Issues
Volume16
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

@article{ba716c91b7b74fb48df1eb00401664bc,
title = "The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland",
abstract = "Across Australia, the feral pig (Sus scrofa) is commonly believed to be a serious environmental and agricultural pest. However, the animal may hold socio-economic and cultural values as a source of food and customary activities, such as hunting in some Aboriginal communities. Such positive values mean that pigs are a resource and that conventional management aimed at controlling or extirpating pigs may require further examination. This paper proposes alternative management strategies based on Altman’s hybrid economy model, which incorporates the customary sector of the Aboriginal economy and considers pig hunting to be an important economic activity as well as a control option. We suggest that collaborative management of pigs with a focus on both environmental and rural development has the potential to deliver acceptable outcomes for Aboriginal people and policy makers. The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282975044_The_Management_Implications_of_Aboriginal_Perceptions_of_Feral_Pigs_Sus_scrofa_in_Northern_Queensland [accessed Dec 01 2017].",
author = "Kana Koichi and K. Sangha and Alison Cottrell and Gordon, {Iain J.}",
year = "2013",
language = "Undefined",
volume = "16",
pages = "53--72",
journal = "Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues",
issn = "1440-5202",
publisher = "Swinburne University of Technology",
number = "2",

}

The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland. / Koichi, Kana; Sangha, K.; Cottrell, Alison; Gordon, Iain J.

In: Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2013, p. 53-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland

AU - Koichi, Kana

AU - Sangha, K.

AU - Cottrell, Alison

AU - Gordon, Iain J.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Across Australia, the feral pig (Sus scrofa) is commonly believed to be a serious environmental and agricultural pest. However, the animal may hold socio-economic and cultural values as a source of food and customary activities, such as hunting in some Aboriginal communities. Such positive values mean that pigs are a resource and that conventional management aimed at controlling or extirpating pigs may require further examination. This paper proposes alternative management strategies based on Altman’s hybrid economy model, which incorporates the customary sector of the Aboriginal economy and considers pig hunting to be an important economic activity as well as a control option. We suggest that collaborative management of pigs with a focus on both environmental and rural development has the potential to deliver acceptable outcomes for Aboriginal people and policy makers. The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282975044_The_Management_Implications_of_Aboriginal_Perceptions_of_Feral_Pigs_Sus_scrofa_in_Northern_Queensland [accessed Dec 01 2017].

AB - Across Australia, the feral pig (Sus scrofa) is commonly believed to be a serious environmental and agricultural pest. However, the animal may hold socio-economic and cultural values as a source of food and customary activities, such as hunting in some Aboriginal communities. Such positive values mean that pigs are a resource and that conventional management aimed at controlling or extirpating pigs may require further examination. This paper proposes alternative management strategies based on Altman’s hybrid economy model, which incorporates the customary sector of the Aboriginal economy and considers pig hunting to be an important economic activity as well as a control option. We suggest that collaborative management of pigs with a focus on both environmental and rural development has the potential to deliver acceptable outcomes for Aboriginal people and policy makers. The Management Implications of Aboriginal Perceptions of Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in Northern Queensland. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282975044_The_Management_Implications_of_Aboriginal_Perceptions_of_Feral_Pigs_Sus_scrofa_in_Northern_Queensland [accessed Dec 01 2017].

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 53

EP - 72

JO - Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues

JF - Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues

SN - 1440-5202

IS - 2

ER -