The role of physical activity and diet on bone mineral indices in young men

a cross-sectional study

Selma Liberato, Josefina Bressan, Andrew Hills

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Background: Osteoporotic fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in developed countries. Increasing peak bone mass in young people may be the most important primary prevention strategy to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dietary factors and physical activity on bone mineralization in young men.

    Methods: Thirty-five healthy men aged 18–25 y had anthropometric measures, body composition, resting metabolic rate, blood pressure, blood lipids, food intake, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed.

    Results: Participants who consumed more than 1000 mg/d of calcium were taller and had higher levels of whole body mineral content than participants who consumed less than 1000 mg/d of calcium. Similarly, participants who expended more than 20% of total daily energy engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity had higher cardiorespiratory fitness and higher levels of body mass adjusted bone mineral content than participants who did not meet this level of energy expenditure. There were no differences in blood pressure or blood lipids between participants in calcium or in physical activity energy expenditure categories.

    Conclusions: A high intake of dietary calcium and high daily energy expenditure engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity were positively associated with bone mineralization in young men, particularly in the lumbar region.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-1-43-7
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    cross-sectional studies
    physical activity
    Minerals
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    bones
    Exercise
    Diet
    minerals
    Bone and Bones
    energy expenditure
    Energy Metabolism
    calcium
    Physiologic Calcification
    bone mineralization
    diet
    Calcium
    blood lipids
    blood pressure
    mineral content
    food intake

    Cite this

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    title = "The role of physical activity and diet on bone mineral indices in young men: a cross-sectional study",
    abstract = "Background: Osteoporotic fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in developed countries. Increasing peak bone mass in young people may be the most important primary prevention strategy to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dietary factors and physical activity on bone mineralization in young men.Methods: Thirty-five healthy men aged 18–25 y had anthropometric measures, body composition, resting metabolic rate, blood pressure, blood lipids, food intake, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed.Results: Participants who consumed more than 1000 mg/d of calcium were taller and had higher levels of whole body mineral content than participants who consumed less than 1000 mg/d of calcium. Similarly, participants who expended more than 20{\%} of total daily energy engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity had higher cardiorespiratory fitness and higher levels of body mass adjusted bone mineral content than participants who did not meet this level of energy expenditure. There were no differences in blood pressure or blood lipids between participants in calcium or in physical activity energy expenditure categories.Conclusions: A high intake of dietary calcium and high daily energy expenditure engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity were positively associated with bone mineralization in young men, particularly in the lumbar region.",
    author = "Selma Liberato and Josefina Bressan and Andrew Hills",
    year = "2013",
    doi = "10.1186/1550-2783-10-43",
    language = "English",
    volume = "10",
    pages = "43--1--43--7",
    journal = "Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition",
    issn = "1550-2783",
    publisher = "BioMed Central",
    number = "1",

    }

    The role of physical activity and diet on bone mineral indices in young men : a cross-sectional study. / Liberato, Selma; Bressan, Josefina; Hills, Andrew.

    In: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2013, p. 43-1-43-7.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The role of physical activity and diet on bone mineral indices in young men

    T2 - a cross-sectional study

    AU - Liberato, Selma

    AU - Bressan, Josefina

    AU - Hills, Andrew

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Background: Osteoporotic fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in developed countries. Increasing peak bone mass in young people may be the most important primary prevention strategy to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dietary factors and physical activity on bone mineralization in young men.Methods: Thirty-five healthy men aged 18–25 y had anthropometric measures, body composition, resting metabolic rate, blood pressure, blood lipids, food intake, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed.Results: Participants who consumed more than 1000 mg/d of calcium were taller and had higher levels of whole body mineral content than participants who consumed less than 1000 mg/d of calcium. Similarly, participants who expended more than 20% of total daily energy engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity had higher cardiorespiratory fitness and higher levels of body mass adjusted bone mineral content than participants who did not meet this level of energy expenditure. There were no differences in blood pressure or blood lipids between participants in calcium or in physical activity energy expenditure categories.Conclusions: A high intake of dietary calcium and high daily energy expenditure engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity were positively associated with bone mineralization in young men, particularly in the lumbar region.

    AB - Background: Osteoporotic fractures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in developed countries. Increasing peak bone mass in young people may be the most important primary prevention strategy to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dietary factors and physical activity on bone mineralization in young men.Methods: Thirty-five healthy men aged 18–25 y had anthropometric measures, body composition, resting metabolic rate, blood pressure, blood lipids, food intake, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed.Results: Participants who consumed more than 1000 mg/d of calcium were taller and had higher levels of whole body mineral content than participants who consumed less than 1000 mg/d of calcium. Similarly, participants who expended more than 20% of total daily energy engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity had higher cardiorespiratory fitness and higher levels of body mass adjusted bone mineral content than participants who did not meet this level of energy expenditure. There were no differences in blood pressure or blood lipids between participants in calcium or in physical activity energy expenditure categories.Conclusions: A high intake of dietary calcium and high daily energy expenditure engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity were positively associated with bone mineralization in young men, particularly in the lumbar region.

    U2 - 10.1186/1550-2783-10-43

    DO - 10.1186/1550-2783-10-43

    M3 - Article

    VL - 10

    SP - 43-1-43-7

    JO - Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition

    JF - Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition

    SN - 1550-2783

    IS - 1

    ER -