The stories of women who are transferred due to threat of preterm birth

Lyn Woodhart, Jessica Goldstone, Donna Hartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Women at risk of preterm birth before 32 weeks gestation are routinely transferred to facilitate birth at a hospital that has Neonatal Intensive Care. The clinical outcomes of being ‘in-born” improves newborn and neonatal outcomes is well documented. However little is known about the women's experiences when such a complication occurs.

Method: Using the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation Patient and Carer stories method, 10 women were purposively invited and consented to tell their stories. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken during their inpatient stay and then again, by telephone in the months following their baby's due date. Themes were identified, illustrated by exemplars.

Results: All women were multiparous. Without exception, the women said that having the support of their family was the most important factor in coping with their unexpected hospitalisation and the anxiety of having to deal with the uncertainty of their pregnancy outcome. The most difficult aspect of their experience was the distress of being separated from their children and families and undue stress and distress from their partners. Other issues they identified were: physical difficulties during transfer; information overload as they sought to understand their changing circumstances; accommodation issues; and financial stress resulting from their relocation.

Conclusions: All women perceived their midwifery, obstetric and neonatal care to be exceptional and their neonatal outcomes were positive. Improvements may be made by facilitating family contact allowing flexible visiting, assisting with partner/family accommodation, providing women with their basic needs during transport and providing assistance to relieve financial strain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-312
Number of pages6
JournalWomen and Birth
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Premature Birth
Neonatal Intensive Care
Midwifery
Pregnancy Outcome
Telephone
Caregivers
Obstetrics
Uncertainty
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Anxiety
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Interviews
Pregnancy

Cite this

Woodhart, Lyn ; Goldstone, Jessica ; Hartz, Donna. / The stories of women who are transferred due to threat of preterm birth. In: Women and Birth. 2018 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 307-312.
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The stories of women who are transferred due to threat of preterm birth. / Woodhart, Lyn; Goldstone, Jessica; Hartz, Donna.

In: Women and Birth, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.08.2018, p. 307-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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