The use of lead isotopes in monitoring environmental impacts of uranium and lead mining in Northern Australia

Niels Munksgaard, J Brazier, C Moir, David Parry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Lead isotope ratios, determined by inductively coupled plasma quadropole mass spectrometry (ICPMS), have been used to assess environmental impacts from uranium and lead mining in northern Australia. The lead isotope composition of most environmental samples contained evidence of mixing of two or more end-member components; their characteristic lead isotope ratios allowed lead sources to be unambiguously identified. The isotopic characteristics and sources identified include highly radiogenic lead (low207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb ratios) in sediments from the Finniss River derived from the former Rum Jungle uranium mine; relatively non-radiogenic lead (high 207pb/206Pb and 208pb/206Pb ratios) in the livers of magpie geese from the Finniss River floodplains, originating from lead ores via ingested lead shot; and relatively non-radiogenic lead in seagrass leaves and oyster soft tissue from the Gulf of Carpentaria resulting from dispersion of small amounts of lead-zinc concentrate from a coastal loading facility.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)233-238
    Number of pages6
    JournalAustralian Journal of Chemistry
    Volume56
    Issue number2-3
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The use of lead isotopes in monitoring environmental impacts of uranium and lead mining in Northern Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this