They really want to go back home, they hate it here: The importance of place in Canadian health professionals' views on the barriers facing Aboriginal patients accessing kidney transplants

K ANDERSON, K YEATES, Joan Cunningham, J DEVITT, A Cass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aboriginal Canadian patients with end-stage kidney disease receive disproportionately fewer transplants than non-Aboriginal patients. The reasons for this are poorly understood and likely to be complex. This qualitative study employed thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with Canadian kidney health professionals (n=23) from programs across Canada to explore their perspective on this disparity. Individual-level factors were the most commonly reported barriers to Aboriginal patients accessing transplants-most notable of which was patients' remote living location. Understanding the role of 'place' as a barrier to accessing care and the lived experiences of Aboriginal patients emerged as key research priorities. � 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-393
Number of pages4
JournalHealth and Place
Volume15
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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