To catch a buffalo

field immobilisation of Asian swamp buffalo using etorphine and xylazine

Clive McMahon, Corey Bradshaw

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: To demonstrate the efficacy of a mixture of etorphine and xylazine to safely immobilise wild buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the field. Methods: Body mass was estimated (to calculate mass-specific dosages) by deriving a predictive relationship between morphometric measurements (body length, height) and mass based on a dataset collected in Vietnam, because the study animals could not be weighed in the field. Results: Mass-specific dosages varied between 0.02 and 0.03 mg/kg for etorphine and between 0.14 and 0.22 mg/kg for xyalazine; induction times varied between 10 and 33 min, mean recumbency time was 68 min, and the mean time to standing was 10 min (range: 10-17 min). Conclusions: The mixture of ethorphine and xylazine was effective for immobilisation of this species and appeared to have a relatively large safety margin, based on the mass-specific dosages used. The allometric relationships described here should prove useful for those working with wild swamp buffalo. � 2008 The Authors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)235-241
    Number of pages7
    JournalAustralian Veterinary Journal
    Volume86
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Etorphine
    etorphine
    Xylazine
    Wetlands
    Buffaloes
    xylazine
    Immobilization
    buffaloes
    Body Height
    Vietnam
    dosage
    margin of safety
    Safety
    body length
    animals

    Cite this

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    title = "To catch a buffalo: field immobilisation of Asian swamp buffalo using etorphine and xylazine",
    abstract = "Objective: To demonstrate the efficacy of a mixture of etorphine and xylazine to safely immobilise wild buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the field. Methods: Body mass was estimated (to calculate mass-specific dosages) by deriving a predictive relationship between morphometric measurements (body length, height) and mass based on a dataset collected in Vietnam, because the study animals could not be weighed in the field. Results: Mass-specific dosages varied between 0.02 and 0.03 mg/kg for etorphine and between 0.14 and 0.22 mg/kg for xyalazine; induction times varied between 10 and 33 min, mean recumbency time was 68 min, and the mean time to standing was 10 min (range: 10-17 min). Conclusions: The mixture of ethorphine and xylazine was effective for immobilisation of this species and appeared to have a relatively large safety margin, based on the mass-specific dosages used. The allometric relationships described here should prove useful for those working with wild swamp buffalo. � 2008 The Authors.",
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    author = "Clive McMahon and Corey Bradshaw",
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    To catch a buffalo : field immobilisation of Asian swamp buffalo using etorphine and xylazine. / McMahon, Clive; Bradshaw, Corey.

    In: Australian Veterinary Journal, Vol. 86, No. 6, 2008, p. 235-241.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - To catch a buffalo

    T2 - field immobilisation of Asian swamp buffalo using etorphine and xylazine

    AU - McMahon, Clive

    AU - Bradshaw, Corey

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - Objective: To demonstrate the efficacy of a mixture of etorphine and xylazine to safely immobilise wild buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the field. Methods: Body mass was estimated (to calculate mass-specific dosages) by deriving a predictive relationship between morphometric measurements (body length, height) and mass based on a dataset collected in Vietnam, because the study animals could not be weighed in the field. Results: Mass-specific dosages varied between 0.02 and 0.03 mg/kg for etorphine and between 0.14 and 0.22 mg/kg for xyalazine; induction times varied between 10 and 33 min, mean recumbency time was 68 min, and the mean time to standing was 10 min (range: 10-17 min). Conclusions: The mixture of ethorphine and xylazine was effective for immobilisation of this species and appeared to have a relatively large safety margin, based on the mass-specific dosages used. The allometric relationships described here should prove useful for those working with wild swamp buffalo. � 2008 The Authors.

    AB - Objective: To demonstrate the efficacy of a mixture of etorphine and xylazine to safely immobilise wild buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the field. Methods: Body mass was estimated (to calculate mass-specific dosages) by deriving a predictive relationship between morphometric measurements (body length, height) and mass based on a dataset collected in Vietnam, because the study animals could not be weighed in the field. Results: Mass-specific dosages varied between 0.02 and 0.03 mg/kg for etorphine and between 0.14 and 0.22 mg/kg for xyalazine; induction times varied between 10 and 33 min, mean recumbency time was 68 min, and the mean time to standing was 10 min (range: 10-17 min). Conclusions: The mixture of ethorphine and xylazine was effective for immobilisation of this species and appeared to have a relatively large safety margin, based on the mass-specific dosages used. The allometric relationships described here should prove useful for those working with wild swamp buffalo. � 2008 The Authors.

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