Towards a global list of accepted species II. Consequences of inadequate taxonomic list governance

Scott A. Thomson, Kevin Thiele, Stijn Conix, Les Christidis, Mark John Costello, Donald Hobern, Svetlana Nikolaeva, Richard L. Pyle, Peter Paul van Dijk, Haylee Weaver, Frank E. Zachos, Zhi Qiang Zhang, Stephen T. Garnett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Species lists are widely used in legislation and regulation to manage and conserve biodiversity. In this paper, we explore the issues caused by the lack of an adequately governed and universally accepted list of the world’s species. These include lack of quality control, duplicated effort, conflicts of interest, lack of currency, and confusion in the scientific use of taxonomic information. If species lists are to fulfill their role efficiently, then the governance systems underlying their creation must keep pace. Fortunately, modernization of species list governance is now possible as a result of advances in biodiversity informatics and two decades of experience working to create the backbone of a global species list.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)623-630
    Number of pages8
    JournalOrganisms Diversity and Evolution
    Volume21
    Issue number4
    Early online dateOct 2021
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

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