Trends in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the Northern Territory, 2001-2013

Bernard Leckning, Shu Qin Li, Teresa Cunningham, Steven Guthridge, Gary Robinson, Tricia Nagel, Sven Silburn

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective: To investigate trends in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the Northern Territory (NT) resident population over the period 2001–2013.

    Methods: Estimates of age-standardised rates and average changes in the annual rate of hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour were calculated by socio-demographic characteristics and types of suicidal behaviour.

    Results: Overall rates for Indigenous admissions were 2.7 times higher than non-Indigenous admissions and had increased by almost twice as much. While male and female rates of admission were similar for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents, the average annual change in rates was greater for Indigenous females (13.4%) compared to males (8.8%) and for non-Indigenous males (7.7%) compared to females (5.2%). Younger and middle-aged Indigenous admissions experienced increasing rates of admissions, whilst trends were similar across age groups for non-Indigenous admissions. Admissions with a diagnosis of suicidal ideation increased the most across all groups. Trends in intentional self-harm admissions differed according to Indigenous status and sex.

    Conclusions: There have been substantial increases in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the NT, most markedly for Indigenous residents. Indigenous females and youth appear to be at increasing risk. The steep increase in suicidal ideation across all groups warrants further investigation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)300-304
    Number of pages5
    JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
    Volume24
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Trends in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the Northern Territory, 2001-2013'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this