Tropical grassy biomes

misunderstood, neglected, and under threat

Catherine Parr, Caroline Lehmann, William Bond, William Hoffmann, Alan Andersen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) are globally extensive, provide critical ecosystem services, and influence the earth–atmosphere system. Yet, globally applied biome definitions ignore vegetation characteristics that are critical to their functioning and evolutionary history. Hence, TGB identification is inconsistent and misinterprets the ecological processes governing vegetation structure, with cascading negative consequences for biodiversity. Here, we discuss threats linked to the definition of TGB, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
    and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation schemes (REDD+), and enhanced atmospheric CO2, which may facilitate future state shifts. TGB degradation is insidious and less visible than in forested biomes. With human reliance on TGBs and their propensity for woody change, ecology and evolutionary history are fundamental to not only the identification of
    TGBs, but also their management for future persistence.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)205-213
    Number of pages9
    JournalTrends in Ecology and Ecolution
    Volume29
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

    Fingerprint

    biome
    ecosystems
    clean development mechanism
    history
    degradation
    vegetation structure
    deforestation
    ecosystem service
    ecosystem services
    persistence
    biodiversity
    ecology
    vegetation

    Cite this

    Parr, Catherine ; Lehmann, Caroline ; Bond, William ; Hoffmann, William ; Andersen, Alan. / Tropical grassy biomes : misunderstood, neglected, and under threat. In: Trends in Ecology and Ecolution. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 205-213.
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    abstract = "Tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) are globally extensive, provide critical ecosystem services, and influence the earth–atmosphere system. Yet, globally applied biome definitions ignore vegetation characteristics that are critical to their functioning and evolutionary history. Hence, TGB identification is inconsistent and misinterprets the ecological processes governing vegetation structure, with cascading negative consequences for biodiversity. Here, we discuss threats linked to the definition of TGB, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation schemes (REDD+), and enhanced atmospheric CO2, which may facilitate future state shifts. TGB degradation is insidious and less visible than in forested biomes. With human reliance on TGBs and their propensity for woody change, ecology and evolutionary history are fundamental to not only the identification ofTGBs, but also their management for future persistence.",
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    Parr, C, Lehmann, C, Bond, W, Hoffmann, W & Andersen, A 2014, 'Tropical grassy biomes: misunderstood, neglected, and under threat', Trends in Ecology and Ecolution, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 205-213. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2014.02.004

    Tropical grassy biomes : misunderstood, neglected, and under threat. / Parr, Catherine; Lehmann, Caroline; Bond, William; Hoffmann, William; Andersen, Alan.

    In: Trends in Ecology and Ecolution, Vol. 29, No. 4, 04.2014, p. 205-213.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Lehmann, Caroline

    AU - Bond, William

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    AU - Andersen, Alan

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    AB - Tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) are globally extensive, provide critical ecosystem services, and influence the earth–atmosphere system. Yet, globally applied biome definitions ignore vegetation characteristics that are critical to their functioning and evolutionary history. Hence, TGB identification is inconsistent and misinterprets the ecological processes governing vegetation structure, with cascading negative consequences for biodiversity. Here, we discuss threats linked to the definition of TGB, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation schemes (REDD+), and enhanced atmospheric CO2, which may facilitate future state shifts. TGB degradation is insidious and less visible than in forested biomes. With human reliance on TGBs and their propensity for woody change, ecology and evolutionary history are fundamental to not only the identification ofTGBs, but also their management for future persistence.

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