Understanding how Aboriginal culture can contribute to the resilient future of rangelands: the importance of Aboriginal core values

Mal Ridges, Mick Kelly, Geoff Simpson, John Leys, Sandy Booth, Margaret Friedel, Ngyampaa Country

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Abstract

There are numerous examples illustrating the integration of Aboriginal knowledge and participation in rangelands management. At the 2019 Australian Rangelands Conference we aimed to explore how Aboriginal culture and its core values have something deeper to contribute to rangelands management. We explore this through a Yungadhu (Malleefowl) cultural depiction and story. The depiction and story explain the often cited, but not well understood, concepts of Kinship, Country, Lore, and Dreaming. The story provides insight into Aboriginal people's world view and is used in this paper to illustrate how well it aligns with current thinking about resilience in rangelands landscapes and communities. Significantly, we explain how the deep wisdom that resides in Aboriginal cultures has something meaningful to contribute to achieving the conditions for resilience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-251
Number of pages5
JournalThe Rangeland Journal
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

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